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Showing posts tagged with How To

September 07, 2016

David Isbitski

When creating your own Alexa skill, there may be times when you would like to change the way Alexa speaks.  Perhaps she isn’t pronouncing a word correctly, maybe her inflections are too serious or you may find the need to include a short audio clip. Speech Synthesis Markup Language, or SSML, is a standardized markup language that provides a way to markup text for changing how speech is synthesized. Numerous SSML tags are currently supported by the Alexa Skills Kit including: speak, p, s, break, say-as, phoneme, w and audio.

This 20-minute video will walk you through adding SSML support to your Alexa skill and shows exactly how to pause Alexa’s speech, change how she pronounces a word and how to create and embed your own audio tags.

For more information about getting started with Alexa and SSML, check out the following:

Speech Synthesis Markup Language (SSML) Reference
Alexa Dev Chat Podcast
Intro to Alexa Skills On Demand
Voice Design 101 On Demand
Alexa Skills Kit (ASK)
Alexa Developer Forums

-Dave (@TheDaveDev)

 

September 01, 2016

Noelle LaCharite

We are excited to share a new template for developers, GameHelper. This template helps you build game guides or user guides for your favorite game. In this tutorial, we will build a skill that tells you how to play chess. There will be five main interaction points that will provide information about how to play the game. The skill in this example will also have the ability to provide a user with a random tip to help improve a user’s game. For this game we also thought it would be interesting to allow the user to ask Alexa about a certain chess piece and get some information about it.

This skill can be adapted to accommodate your favorite game, by changing some basic text. It is also possible to add extra functionality to show features of your favorite game.

After completing this tutorial, you'll know how to do the following:

  • Create a decision-based skill - This tutorial will walk first-time Alexa skills developers through all the required steps involved in creating a decision-based skill using a template called ‘GameHelper’.
  • Understand the basics of VUI design - Creating this skill will help you understand the basics of creating a working Voice User Interface (VUI) while using a cut/paste approach to development. You will learn by doing, and end up with a published Alexa skill. This tutorial includes instructions on how to customize the skill and submit for certification. For guidance on designing a voice experience with Alexa you can also watch this video.
  • Use JavaScript/Node.js and the Alexa Skills Kit to create a skill - You will use the template as a guide but the customization is up to you. For more background information on using the Alexa Skills Kit please watch this video.
  • Get your skill published - Once you have completed your skill, this tutorial will guide you through testing your skill and sending your skill through the certification process for making it available to be enabled by any Alexa user.
[Read More]

August 26, 2016

Michael Palermo

Today’s post comes from J. Michael Palermo IV, Sr. Evangelist at Amazon Alexa. In this post you’ll learn what directives are and how to develop a smart home skill adapter from scratch using Node.js.

Much of the heavy lifting for creating smart home skills happens before writing a line of code. In my last post, I walked you through the five  prerequisites to building a smart home skill. You may have noticed I left the code for the AWS Lambda function blank. In this post, you will start where that post ended. Not only will see how to manage the code workflow for a smart home skill adapter using Node.js, but you will also learn the fundamentals of the directive language, the communication protocol used between your skill adapter and the Smart Home Skill API.

Skill Adapter Directive Language

Before tackling any lines of code, you should understand the role of your skill adapter in the smart home skill process workflow. When the Alexa service understands the intent of a voice command to be smart home related, it continues processing through the Smart Home Skill API. The Smart Home Skill API service then communicates with a skill adapter using directive language, a JSON protocol structured to convey requests and responses. Each unique instance of a request or a response is known as a directive. All communications between your skill adapter and the Smart Home Skill API use the directive language. Your skill adapter receives requests as directives and is responsible for providing responses as directives.
 


Figure 1 : Directive Language

The structure of a directive involves two primary components, a header and a payload. While the payload varies in structure based on context, the header is fixed with just four fields defined here.

Table 1 : Directive header fields

Field

Value

messageId

A unique identifier (typically version 4 UUID) for each directive. Used for tracking/logging. Not to be used to support business logic.

name

The purpose of the directive, chosen from a predefined list of names. See Smart Home Skill API reference for supported directive names.

namespace

The category of the directive, such as  “Alexa.ConnectedHome.Discovery” or “Alexa.ConnectedHome.Control”

payloadVersion

The API version in use. The current version is “2”

Consider an example of an incoming directive from the Smart Home Skill API service to a skill adapter.

{

 "header" : {

  "messageId" : "6d6d6e14-8aee-473e-8c24-0d31ff9c17a2",

  "name" : "DiscoverAppliancesRequest",

  "namespace" : "Alexa.ConnectedHome.Discovery",

  "payloadVersion" : "2"

 },

 "payload" : {

  "accessToken" : "acc355t0ken"

 }

}

In the header, the namespace reveals the category of the directive is “Alexa.ConnectedHome.Discovery”, and the name “DiscoverAppliancesRequest” indicates a device discovery request is being made to a skill adapter. Because all smart home skill adapters require account linking at time of enablement, the payload will include the access token associated with the customer’s device cloud account. The value shown above is a mocked value used for testing purposes only. For more background about account linking and access tokens, please see this blog post.

[Read More]

August 24, 2016

David Isbitski

Before today, the Alexa Skills Kit enabled short audio via SSML audio tags on your skill responses. Today we are excited to announce that we have now added streaming audio support for Alexa skills including playback controls. This means you can easily create skills that playback audio content like podcasts, news stories, and live streams.

New AudioPlayer and PlaybackController interfaces provide directives and requests for streaming audio and monitoring playback progression. With this new feature, your skill can send audio directives to start and stop the playback. The Alexa service can provide your skill with information about the audio playback’s state, such as when the track is nearly finished, or when playback starts and stops. Alexa can also now send requests in response to hardware buttons, such as those on a remote control.

Enabling Audio Playback Support in Your Skill

To enable audio playback support in your skill you simply need to turn the Audio Player functionality on and handle the new audio Intents. Navigate to the Alexa developer portal and do the following:

  • On the Skill Information page in the developer portal, set the Audio Player option to Yes.
     
  • Include the required built-in intents for pausing and resuming audio in your intent schema and implement them in some way:
    • AMAZON.PauseIntent
    • AMAZON.ResumeIntent
       
  • Call the AudioPlayer.Play Directive from one of your Intents to start the Audio Playback
     
  • Handle AudioPlayer and PlaybackController Requests and optionally respond

In addition to the required built-in intents, your skill should gracefully handle the following additional built-in intents:
 

  • AMAZON.CancelIntent
  • AMAZON.LoopOffIntent
  • AMAZON.LoopOnIntent
  • AMAZON.NextIntent
  • AMAZON.PreviousIntent
  • AMAZON.RepeatIntent
  • AMAZON.ShuffleOffIntent
  • AMAZON.ShuffleOnIntent
  • AMAZON.StartOverIntent

Note: Users can invoke these built-in intents without using your skill’s invocation name. For example, while in a podcast skill you create, a user could say “Alexa Next” and your skill would play the next episode.

If your skill is currently playing audio, or was the skill most recently playing audio, these intents are automatically sent to your skill. Your code needs to expect them and not return an error. If any of these intents does not apply to your skill, handle it in an appropriate  way in your code. For instance, you could return a response with text-to-speech indicating that the command is not relevant to the skill. The specific message depends on the skill and whether the intent is one that might make sense at some point, for example:
 

  • For a podcast skill, the AMAZON.ShuffleOnIntent intent might return the message: “I can’t shuffle a podcast.”
  • For version 1.0 of a music skill that doesn’t yet support playlists and shuffling, the AMAZON.ShuffleOnIntent intent might return: “Sorry, I can’t shuffle music yet.”


Note: If your skill uses the AudioPlayer directives, you cannot extend the above built-in intents with your own sample utterances.

[Read More]

August 18, 2016

Michael Palermo

Today’s post comes from J. Michael Palermo IV, Sr. Evangelist at Amazon Alexa. Learn what steps you should take before developing with the Smart Home Skill API.

Before creating a skill, you must first determine if you want to build a custom skill or a smart home skill. Most skills are built using the Alexa Skills Kit (ASK) and are broadly known as custom skills. However, if the end goal is to enable a skill to have voice control over a device or appliance in the home, you will want to develop a smart home skill using the Smart Home Skill API.

Smart home skills differ from custom skills in these ways:

  • With custom skills, you must build a voice interaction model to handle customer requests. Smart home skills use Amazon’s standardized language model so you don’t have to build the voice interaction model. As such, your customers don’t need to remember your skill name or a specific invocation phrase. Furthermore, customers who already control devices using Alexa with other smart home skills already know how to use your smart home skill, and will also enjoy a consistent, first class experience with your devices.
  • The smart home skill adapter must be hosted in an AWS Lambda function, whereas custom skills can be hosted in either AWS Lambda or another cloud-based hosting service.
  • You must implement account linking using OAuth 2.0 for smart home skills, while this is optional for custom skills.
  • Since smart home skills target connected devices in the home, you must have access to a cloud-based API to handle device discovery and control.

With the above differences in mind, your approach to creating a smart home skill may require more work to be done upfront than with a custom skill. However, know that with a smart home API skill, you wouldn’t need to define and maintain a language model yourself, and as Alexa improves its language model overall, you get the improvements for free.

Meeting the Smart Home Skill API Prerequisites, Step by Step

Follow these steps to confirm you have what you need before developing a smart home skill. Start by following these five steps to meet the Smart Home Skill API prerequisites:
 

  1. Choose OAuth 2.0 provider for account linking
  2. Initialize creation of smart home skill
  3. Create an AWS Lambda Function
  4. Configure smart home skill
  5. Finalize account linking and confirm
     

Step 1: Choose OAuth 2.0 Provider for Account Linking

Sebastien Stormacq recently authored an excellent blog post providing step-by-step guidance to implement account linking for custom skills. While much of the information in that post applies here too, there are some differences in implementation details. This post will provide complete guidance for setting up account linking for smart home skills, with some admitted overlap to Sebastien’s post. For a fine overview of OAuth 2.0 and understanding of options, it may benefit you to read the first two sections of his post and then resume here.

If you have already created or chosen a specific OAuth 2.0 provider, you can proceed to the next step. If not, the remainder of this step will show how to fulfill this requirement by using Login with Amazon (LWA).

First, you need to create an LWA security profile. Here’s how:
 

  • Connect to https://developer.amazon.com and authenticate with your Amazon credentials.
  • Click on “Apps & Services”, then “Login with Amazon”
  • Click on “Create a New Security Profile”

 

Figure 1 : Access Login With Amazon.

Fill in all three required fields to create your security profile and click “Save”. For the purpose of this post, the privacy URL points to Amazon’s. Make sure to replace the link with a link to your own Data Privacy policy.

[Read More]

August 03, 2016

Sebastien Stormacq

Discover how to use account linking with Login with Amazon to seamlessly integrate your Alexa skills with third-party application. Get step-by-step instructions from Sebastien Stormacq, Sr. Solutions Architect at Amazon.

How Account Linking Enhances Alexa Skills

Some skills require the ability to connect the identity of an Alexa end user with a user in another system, such as Twitter, Facebook, Amazon, and many others. For example, suppose you own a web-based service “Car-Fu” that lets users order taxis. It would be very convenient for people to access Car-Fu by voice (“Alexa, ask Car-Fu to order a taxi”).

To accomplish that, you’d use a process called account linking, which provides a secure way for Alexa skills to connect with third-party systems requiring authentication.

Skills that use the Smart Home Skill API must use account linking (with the authorization code grant flow) to connect the Alexa user with their device cloud account. Custom skills can use account linking if desired. However, if your custom skill merely needs to keep track of a user to save attributes between sessions, you do not need to use account linking.

There are many ways you can use account linking to enhance your Alexa skills. For example:

  • You can map this user profile to an existing user in your user database, using the email address as key. This would allow you to create a contextual skill that behaves according to your user’s preferences and history.
  • You can decide what authorizations this user will have in your system.
  • You can use services such as Amazon Cognito to acquire an AWS Access Key and Secret Key to interact with AWS Services such as Amazon DynamoDB.

The Basics of Account Linking with the Login with Amazon (LWA) Service

Account linking leverages OAuth 2.0; an open protocol that provides a simple, standards-based method for web, mobile and desktop applications to request user authorization from remote servers.

As a skill developer, you could set up and configure your own OAuth server and identity management system. At some large companies, an OAuth server is probably already available and Identity Management procedures already in place. However, at smaller companies, this would require you to build, operate, and maintain your own complex system to manage user identities, passwords, and profiles in a secure and scalable way.

Many organizations rely instead on well-known identity providers, available on the internet. These are sites where nearly everyone has an account, such as Facebook, Google, Twitter, and Amazon. The service that acts as a public-facing identity provider for Amazon is Login with Amazon.

When using OAuth, you delegate user authentication to a third-party Identity Provider (IDP). As illustrated below, the user is redirected to the IDP web site. User authentication happens according to the IDP’s policies (username and password, one-time password, biometric, etc.), and upon successful authentication, the IDP generates an implicit grant (aka bearer token) or an authorization code grant.

The bearer token is the token you'll use for accessing information and services. On the other hand, an authorization code can only be used to request a bearer token. This usually happens on the backend, between your application server and the IDP service. While an implicit grant is often faster and simpler for developers to request, an authorization code grant is generally considered more secure and some IDPs may require it for sensitive information or services. Also, a code grant allows for automatic refreshing of the bearer token after a given expiry, which will be set according to the IDP’s policy. When using an implicit grant, the user has to manually re-authenticate themselves when attempting to use the service, which, depending on the lifespan of the bearer token, can cause friction for account linking in applications.

After authentication is complete and a valid token is received, your application is responsible for managing authorization based on the customer's profile.

Figure 1 : OAuth data flow

Account Linking, Step by Step

Follow these steps to configure your Alexa skills with account linking and Login with Amazon.

[Read More]

August 02, 2016

Robert Jamison

Today, we're pleased to make a tool with source code available to allow you to graphically design interactive adventure games for Alexa. Interactive adventure games represent a new category of skill that allows customers to engage with stories using their voice. With these skills, you can showcase original content or build compelling companion experiences to existing books, movies and games. For example, in The Wayne Investigation skill (4.7 stars, 48 reviews), you’re transported to Gotham City a few days after the murder of Bruce Wayne’s parents. You play the part of a detective, investigating the crime and interrogating interesting characters, with Alexa guiding you through multiple virtual rooms, giving you choices, and helping you find important clues. The Magic Door, an original adventure series for Alexa, enables you to tell Alexa what choices to make as you navigate a forest, a garden or an ancient temple. Learn more about game skills on Alexa.

This tool provides an easy to use front-end that allows developers to instantly deploy code for your story, or use the generated code as a starting point for more complex projects. It was written in Node.js by Thomas Yuill, a designer and engineer in the Amazon Advertising team. The tool is available now as a Github project: https://github.com/alexa/interactive-adventure-game-tool

If you want to get started quickly, you can use our Trivia or Decision Tree skill templates that make it easy for developers or non-developers to create game skills. These template makes it easy for developers or non-developers to create a skill similar to “European Vacation Recommender” or “Astronomy Trivia." The templates leverages AWS Lambda and the Alexa Skills Kit (ASK) while providing the business logic, use cases, error handling and help functions for your skill. You just need to come up with a decision tree-based idea or trivia game, plug in your questions and edit the sample provided (we walk you through how it’s done). It's a valuable way to quickly learn the end-to-end process for building and publishing an Alexa skill.

[Read More]

August 02, 2016

Noelle LaCharite

We are excited to introduce a new way to help you quickly build useful and meaningful skills for Alexa. The new Decision Tree skill template makes it easy for developers and non-developers to create skills that ask you a series of questions and then give you an answer. This is a great starter for simple adventure games and magazine style quizzes like ‘what kind of job is good for me’.  This template leverages AWS Lambda and the Alexa Skills Kit, and provides built-in business logic, use cases, error handling, and help functions for your new skill. Simply come up with the idea, plug in your decision tree content, and edit the sample provided. Follow this tutorial and we'll show you how it's done.

Using the Alexa Skills Kit, you can build an application that can receive and respond to voice requests made to Alexa. In this tutorial, you’ll build a web service to handle notifications from Alexa and map this service to a skill in the Amazon Developer Portal, making it available on your Echo, Alexa-enabled device, or Echosim.io for testing and to all Alexa users after publication.

When finished, you'll know how to:

  • Create a skill - This tutorial will walk Alexa developers through all the required steps involved in creating a skill. No previous experience required.
  • Design a Voice User Interface - Creating this skill will help you understand the basics of creating a working Voice User Interface (VUI) while using a cut/paste approach to development. You will learn by doing and end up with a published Alexa skill. This tutorial includes instructions on how to customize the skill and submit for certification. For guidance on designing a voice experience with Alexa you can also watch this video.
  • Use JavaScript/Node.js and the Alexa Skills Kit to create a skill - You will use the template as a guide but the customization is up to you. For more background information on using the Alexa Skills Kit please watch this video.
  • Get your skill published - Once you have completed your skill, this tutorial will guide you through testing your skill and sending your skill through the publication process to make it available for any Alexa user to enable.

You will also need an AWS account and an Amazon Developer account. To get a refresher on how to do this, or if you are new to skill development, you can visit our training page to review our past tutorials.

[Read More]

July 21, 2016

Marion Desmazieres

The Amazon Alexa team has collaborated with Big Nerd Ranch, known globally for its highly effective immersive development bootcamps and app development services, to develop deep technical training courses for the Alexa Skills Kit. Today we launch a new developer education experience that showcases all the free learning materials created in collaboration with Big Nerd Ranch.

Our six educational modules will dive into building voice user interfaces using the Alexa Skills Kit. The training materials will teach you about the Alexa skill architecture and interface configuration, slots and utterances, sessions and voice user interfaces, persistence, account linking, and certification and testing.

Each module page features a variety of learning materials:

  • Short and sweet videos you can easily share, save for later, or add to your own playlist on YouTube,
  • Learning objectives that summarize what you will learn,
  • Reference links to find more about Alexa Skills Kit features and technologies covered in the training,
  • Code samples on GitHub to follow along and build custom Alexa skills,
  • Condensed posts published on the Alexa blog,
  • Complete study guides to learn more and solve bonus challenges.

Start learning: check out our new developer education pages.

Learn More

Check out these Alexa developer resources:

 

July 19, 2016

David Isbitski

Today we’re happy to announce the new alexa-sdk for Node.js to help you build skills faster and with less complexity. Creating an Alexa skill using the Alexa Skills Kit, Node.js and AWS Lambda has become one of the most popular ways we see skills created today. The event-driven, non-blocking I/O model of Node.js is well suited for an Alexa skill and Node.js is one of the largest ecosystems of open source libraries in the world. Plus, with AWS Lambda is free for the first one million calls per month, which can support skill hosting for most developers. And you don’t need to manage any SSL certificates when using AWS Lambda (since the Alexa Skills Kit is a trusted trigger).

While setting up an Alexa skill using AWS Lambda, Node.js and the Alexa Skills Kit has been a simple process, the actual amount of code you have had to write has not. We have seen a large amount of time spent in Alexa skills on handling session attributes, skill state persistence, response building and behavior modeling. With that in mind the Alexa team set out to build an Alexa Skills Kit SDK specifically for Node.js that will help you avoid common hang-ups and focus on your skill’s logic instead of boiler plate code. 

Enabling Faster Alexa Skill Development with the Alexa Skills Kit for Node.js (alexa-sdk)

With the new alexa-sdk, our goal is to help you build skills faster while allowing you to avoid unneeded complexity. Today, we are launching the SDK with the following capabilities:

  • Hosted as NPM package allowing simple deployment to any Node.js environment
  • Ability to build Alexa responses using built-in events
  • Helper events for new sessions and unhandled events that can act as a ‘catch-all’ events
  • Helper functions to build state-machine based Intent handling
    • This makes it possible to define different event handlers based on the current state of the skill
  • Simple configuration to enable attribute persistence with DynamoDB
  • All speech output is automatically wrapped as SSML
  • Lambda event and context objects are fully available via this.event and this.contextAbility to override built-in functions giving you more flexibility on how you manage state or build responses. For example, saving state attributes to AWS S3.
[Read More]

July 18, 2016

Marion Desmazieres

Today, we’re excited to announce a new Alexa skills course available on Pluralsight, a global leader in online learning for technology professionals. The new course is focused on building custom Alexa skills in C# and ASP.NET Web API. In this four-module course, “Developing Alexa Skills for Amazon Echo”, Alexa developer and Pluralsight author Walter Quesada teaches the foundations of developing voice experiences for Amazon Echo and other Alexa-enabled devices. First, you'll learn the differences between Echo and Alexa, as well as the differences between the Alexa Voice Service and the Alexa Skills Kit. Next, you will quickly evaluate the 'Hello World' node.js sample code provided by Amazon. Finally, you will learn the certification process and requirements, publication stages, and how to create new versions of live skills. By the end of this course, you'll be better prepared to build and publish Alexa skills, or capabilities, for Alexa, the voice service that powers Echo.

Watch the video series for free today.

“I’m excited for developers in the Pluralsight community to watch this first ever course on developing Alexa skills in C# and .NET. I can’t wait to see what you build. Let me know in the Pluralsight discussion forums.” – Walter Quesada, Pluralsight author

Watch Alexa Skills Kit Webinar by Alexa Evangelist, Dave Isbitski

If you need more information about Alexa before getting started, Dave Isbitski, Chief Evangelist for Alexa and Echo, has got you covered. In this exclusive webinar created for Pluralsight, Dave will walk you through the world of Alexa Skills Kit and how you can create your own voice-driven experience. The webinar starts by diving into the basics of Alexa, the SDKs, and resources to get started. Next, you’ll learn how to build an Alexa skill quickly by walking through code and interaction models.

Watch this webinar to learn more about the Alexa Skills Kit today.

Learn More

Check out these Alexa developer resources:

 

July 11, 2016

Marion Desmazieres

Last month we released the first two videos in the Alexa video series created by developer education company Big Nerd Ranch. You can find parts 1 and 2 on the official YouTube Alexa Developers channel. Today we are excited to reveal the next two videos in the Big Nerd Ranch series on how to develop Alexa skills locally with Node.js.

In part 3 of 6, “Sessions and Voice User Interfaces”, we will learn about user sessions. This feature allows an Alexa skill to break more complicated data requirements into a series of steps spanning multiple requests to the skill service. We’ll also learn about Amazon’s voice user interface requirements. Following these requirements is important for getting a skill certified for public availability in the Alexa app. Lastly, we’ll introduce home cards. Cards are a graphical user interface element that can be sent from a skill to the Alexa app.

In part 4 of 6, “Persistence”, we will discuss how to link an Alexa skill with a database so that it can save an unfinished user interaction for later use in another session. Having the ability to persist data between Alexa sessions opens the door for far more versatile and sophisticated skills. We will see how to use Amazon DynamoDB to easily read and write data from an AWS Lambda function skill. We will use a library called Dynasty to interact with Amazon DynamoDB and handle asynchronous results more easily and elegantly.

Stay tuned for the last two videos from Big Nerd Ranch later this month.

Learn More

Check out these Alexa developer resources:

 

June 30, 2016

Marion Desmazieres

Earlier this year we announced that Amazon was teaming up with developer education company Big Nerd Ranch to deliver immersive, free training for the Alexa Skills Kit (ASK). The training shows you how to develop Alexa skills locally with Node.js, from setting up your development environment to submitting a skill for certification and more complex ASK features like account linking and persistence. You can find a recap of all the blog posts published for the training series here.

Today we are excited to release the first two videos in the Big Nerd Ranch video series. These videos kick off the official Alexa Developers channel on YouTube.

In the first video, “Hello, Alexa!”, we’ll introduce the Alexa Skills Kit and teach you how to create Alexa skills, or capabilities, for Alexa. We will build and deploy a basic skill. This skill will be called the “Greeter” skill, and will say hello to users when they invoke the skill using the words that we specify.

 

In the second video, “Slots and Slot Types”, we will see several new features of the skill interaction model that let us build more sophisticated skills. We will expand on what we learned with the Greeter skill by building a more feature-rich skill called “Airport Info”. Airport Info will make requests to the Federal Aviation Administration’s JSON backed web service, and inform users if there is any delay at an airport that they specify.

Stay tuned for more videos from Big Nerd Ranch in July.

Learn More

Check out these Alexa developer resources:

 

June 24, 2016

Noelle LaCharite

We are excited to introduce a new way to help you quickly build useful and meaningful skills for Alexa. The new flash cards skill template makes it easy for developers and non-developers to create a skill similar to ‘Chemistry Flash Cards’, ‘Language Flash Cards’, ‘Exam Prep’, etc. This template leverages AWS Lambda and the Alexa Skills Kit, and provides built-in business logic, uses cases, error handling, and help functions for your new skill. You just need to come up with a flash card idea (like ‘Anatomy Flash Cards’), plug in your flash cards content and edit the sample provided. Don’t worry! We’ll walk you through how it’s done.

Using the Alexa Skills Kit, you can build an application that can receive and respond to voice requests made to Alexa. In this tutorial, you’ll build a web service to handle notifications from Alexa and map this service to a skill in the Amazon Developer Portal, making it available on your Echo, Alexa-enabled device, or Echosim.io for testing and to all Alexa users after publication.

When finished, you'll know how to:

    Create a flash card based skill - This tutorial will walk first-time Alexa developers through all the required steps involved in creating a flash card based skill.

    Design a Voice User Interface - Creating this skill will help you understand the basics of creating a working Voice User Interface (VUI) while using a cut/paste approach to development. You will learn by doing and end up with a published Alexa skill. This tutorial includes instructions on how to customize the skill and submit for certification. For guidance on designing a voice experience with Alexa you can also watch this video.

    Use JavaScript/Node.js and the Alexa Skills Kit to create a skill - You will use the template as a guide but the customization is up to you. For more background information on using the Alexa Skills Kit please watch this video.

    Get your skill published - Once you’ve completed your skill, this tutorial will guide you through testing your skill and sending your skill through the publication process to make it available for any Alexa user to enable.

You will also need an AWS account and an Amazon Developer account. To get a refresher on how to do this, or if you are new to skill development, you can visit our training page to review our past tutorials. This tutorial is built on the trivia template. 

[Read More]

June 21, 2016

Noelle LaCharite

Today's guest post comes from John Wheeler, the creator of Flask-Ask. John has been programming for two decades and has written for O'Reilly and IBM developerWorks.

This post introduces Flask-Ask, a new Python micro-framework that significantly lowers the bar for developing Alexa skills. Flask-Ask is a Flask extension that makes building voice user interfaces with the Alexa Skills Kit easy and fun. We'll learn it by building a simple game that asks you to repeat three numbers backwards. Knowing Python and Flask are not required, but some experience programming will help.

If you prefer the video walkthrough of this post, check it out here.

Create the Skill

To start, you'll need Python installed. If you're on a recent version of OS X or Linux, Python comes preinstalled. On Mac, you can find installation instructions here. You may also need to install pip, which can be found here. On Windows, follow these installation instructions. Once Python and pip are installed, open a terminal, and type the below command to install Flask-Ask. Note: You might need to precede it with sudo on Unix if you get permission errors. 

[Read More]

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