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July 07, 2015

Mike Hines

Learn how the top 50 game developers leverage in-app purchasing to monetize successfully, and get actionable data to help you increase the profitability of your games. I’ll review data Amazon has collected about how users engage with IAP in games, and go into detail about some of the best ways to increase customer conversion and revenue.

You'll Learn:

  • What the top 50 developers do with in-app purchasing that other developers don’t.
  • Actionable data and tips to help you get started.
  • How selection drives engagement and repeat orders.
  • How to increase revenue by launching new IAP price points.

When:

Tuesday, July 14th 10:00AM PDT, 1 hour

 

July 01, 2015

Ankur Prasad

We’d like to share an offer by Applovin – The App Challenge to help Amazon developers monetize.  AppLovin recently announced that Appstore developers can now integrate the Applovin SDK and start monetizing their Amazon apps with ads from Applovin. With this offer, any developer who publishes an app to the Amazon Appstore will receive an additional dollar for every dollar they make from that app using the Applovin SDK. Developers can earn up to $500 dollars and all apps published from 7/1/ 15 – 8/31/15 are eligible to participate in this offer.

How to Participate

This challenge is open to all, so please feel free to refer friends and other developers. For additional details and offer terms and conditions, check out the official announcement by Applovin.

- Ankur

June 30, 2015

Corey Badcock

Get Marketing Tips, Technical Advice and Best Practices Delivered to Your Inbox

Join our community of developers and subscribe to the Amazon Developer Weekly.

Amazon’s developer blog covers everything you need to grow your mobile app business. Get your dose of technical tips, industry insights, product announcements and app marketing best practices delivered to your inbox every Monday. Get articles like these and more when you subscribe:

  • Introducing the Alexa Skills Kit, Enabling Developers to Create Entirely New Voice Driven Capabilities
  • Why Isn’t Your Game Doing Better?
  • Free Video Training: Tips for Reaching New Customers with Your Android Apps

Signing up is easy. Click here to complete the form to subscribe by email today.

 

May 13, 2015

Corey Badcock

As the cost to acquire mobile users continues to rise, developers are starting to evaluate the quality of users they acquire via paid campaigns. Developers need to reach the right mobile users: those who will engage with an app and become loyal over the long term.

To help developers reach new users, we are excited to announce the launch of Advertise Your App with Amazon!  This advertising platform is exclusively available to Amazon mobile app developers. It’s simple, fast, and effective. Promote your app to millions of users on Fire tablet wakescreens and mobile placements on the Amazon Mobile Ad Network.

Amazon Reaches the Big Spenders Best

According to Newzoo, gamers using the Amazon Appstore are the most likely to spend money.  More specifically, 64% of mobile gamers that use the Amazon Appstore spend money on mobile games, versus 37% for Google Play. Amazon users are more likely to engage with your app and spend money, and Advertise Your App enables you to target new customers while driving the installs you need to grow your business.

When you launch an Advertise Your App campaign, your app can be merchandized on Fire tablet wakescreens and mobile placements on the Amazon Mobile Ad Network, enabling you to directly reach Android and Fire users.

Reduce Your Cost of Acquisition with Advertise Your App

To get early feedback on Advertise Your App, we conducted a beta with Amazon Appstore developers. Developers who participated in our beta program had this to say about using Advertise Your App:

We’ve seen the highest revenue per user on the Amazon platform…with an excellent CPI as low as $0.50 via Advertise Your App.”

- Majid Khosravi, Twimler

“Advertise Your App is the most cost effective, scalable solution to acquire the users I care most about!”

- Kevin Tydlacka, Kevin Tydlacka Apps

Ready to get started?

Create an Advertise Your App campaign in less than 90 seconds, and launch a campaign with as little as $100. And the best part? You only pay when a user clicks on one of your ads. For more information check out the following additional resources:

 

 

May 12, 2015

Corey Badcock

How will IoT play out in your ecosystem? Is HTML vs. Native still relevant? Are you using AWS, Azure or Google Cloud? Which are the hottest IoT verticals? These are some of the questions that our friends at VisionMobile address through their Developer Economics research, so take their quick survey and make your voice heard.

Participate in the 10-minute Developer Skill Census survey by June 5th and enter a draw to win prizes such as an Oculus Rift Dev Kit. A free chapter from one of VisionMobile’s premium paid reports will also be given immediately upon completion, taking a close look at app profits & costs. 

Now in its 9th edition, the Developer Economics research program tracks developer sentiment across platforms, revenues, apps, tools, APIs, segments and regions. This is the most ambitious developer survey to date, spanning across mobile, IoT, desktop and Cloud. The key insights from the survey will be given back to the community as a free download in late July.

Take the survey here: vmob.me/DE3Q15Amazon

May 07, 2015

Paul Cutsinger

As a part of our series on helping developers turn great games into great businesses, we’ve been talking about the importance of evolving your players into a fan base. This week we’ve invited Alex Walz of Apptentive to share his advice. Apptentive's software makes it easy for any company with a mobile app to grow retention, boost app store ratings, drive downloads, and earn customer loyalty via in-app messages, surveys, and intelligent ratings.

Building a fan community isn’t an easy task - it takes time and effort. Many mobile publishers adopt an “if you build it, they will come” mentality. As some of you may be experiencing, getting those crucial first customers- rather than building the app -may prove to be your biggest challenge.

After working with thousands of mobile apps, we have figured out a few ways to make creating fandom at scale a little easier for developers. Tools such as ours, compliment all the hard work you’ve done creating your app. Apptentive powers a suite of customer engagement tools that can be integrated into any mobile app to help developers build loyalty, earn customer love, and improve app store rankings – all of which translate to better monetization.

We’ve put together a list of five tips to create a scalable loyalty program that can turn players into fans. Enjoy!

1. Build an App Worth Sharing

The first step is to build an app your players can get excited about – an app they can become fans of. At this year’s Mobile World Congress, Amazon’s Paul Cutsinger made the distinction between ‘player’ sports and ‘spectator’ sports. Player sports (like archery, for example) provide a high level of entertainment value to the player. But there’s not a lot of money to be made in archery – it’s not a business. Such sports are designed to entertain a small niche of players but lack the mass appeal to go viral. Spectator sports, on the other hand, have a much broader audience and can support a product line, brand, business, and most importantly, a fanbase. In his presentation, Paul notes eSports as a prime example of a spectator sport harnessing the power of fandom – and consequently racking in $194 million in revenue.

The same goes for mobile games and other apps. If you want to a fan community, you need to engineer for growth and virality. Build a game that players will not only love, but love to share. This brings us to our next point...

With a beautiful interface, fun gameplay, social authentication, easy sharing, and an additional merchandise line,  Plants vs. Zombies is a top rated apps in the Amazon Appstore

2. Ask For Feedback

Let’s face it: None of us know how to build the perfect game. Fortunately for us, our players do. All we have to do is listen.

With over 400,000 apps in the Amazon Appstore, players have pretty high standards when it comes to evaluating which game to play next. It, therefore, shouldn’t come as much of a surprise that a whopping two-thirds of players ditch a game after fewer than 24 hours. Your players have a pretty good idea of what they’re looking for in a game and can provide a fresh set of eyes to something you’ve been laboring over for months – revealing bugs you’ve overlooked or confusing areas in your interface.

Yet, players rarely have a channel for communicating this feedback. They can either take the time to leave a public review of your app or (as we see much more frequently) simply leave your app without leaving any indication of the factors that led them to that point. To capture this feedback and build an app they’ll truly love, you need to not only listen to your feedback, but proactively solicit it. I’ve found that companies that do exactly that –in the form of in-app messages, surveys, and feedback forms – have grown their customer insight collection 15-fold. In the process of listening and interacting with their players, I’ve seen countless success stories of breaking through the noise, growing lifetime value, and boosting retention by as much as 100%.

Average retention rates for mobile games that proactively engage players vs. those that don’t

3. Integrate with existing social networks

Want to grow your fanbase? Make it easy to be a fan. Your players don’t exist in a vacuum, and neither should your game. By leveraging existing social networks, you can greatly increase your game’s reach and adoption. Social integration typically comes in two ways:

One-step authentication using a Twitter, Facebook, or other social account. Instead of asking players to create an account log in to your game, consider giving them the option to sign in with their preferred social network. In the world of apps, speed and convenience is everything, with one-third of mobile app sessions lasting less than one minute. By getting players signed up faster, you can remove the first barrier of adoption and convert more installs into active players. Registration with social networks can also be used to sync a player’s contacts with the app, allowing him or her to invite friends and effortlessly evangelize your app.

One-click sharing over the player’s preferred social network. Mobile games are becoming increasingly social, and the value of an app is often in its community. How many times have you set a new high score in a game or gotten an achievement, and wanted to challenge your friends to top your score in the leaderboard? With social integration, posing that challenge should never be more than a click of a button away. The easier it is to share your content, the more shares you’ll get.

With the rise of deeplinks, social sharing has never been more important as an app discovery method. Leverage it.

4. Build a Community That Transcends Your App

The previous tip was all about making your app a community. Now it’s time to grow that community beyond your app. Taking another note from Appstore evangelist Paul Cutsinger, this comes down to encouraging the creation (and distribution) of user-generated content that can be shared across the web.

One strategy Riot and several mobile game developers have done to encourage content creation is using Twitch to show championship games and other content streams. Twitch, the live streaming video platform owned by Amazon, started support mobile game streaming last March and provides a way for game developers to spread awareness by sharing gameplay videos to the web and create a second revenue stream through the advertisements shown on Twitch. As of January 2015, the site sees over 100 million views each month, making it a great platform for mobile game promotion.

Other successful strategies include fostering fan communities and message boards, organizing online fan art or fan fiction contests, and creating a product/apparel line associated with your game. For an example of what such a community looks like in action, look no further than Angry Birds – a game that now sees over one-third of its revenue generated from its merchandise empire, with an extensive line of plush toys and t-shirts gracing malls around the world.

Macintosh HD:Users:alexwalz:Desktop:5 Ways To Turn Players Into Fans:angrybirds.jpeg

Angry Birds plush toy. Photo credit: Aira Vehaskari/AFP/Getty Images

5. Solicit Ratings and Reviews

Last but not least, you’ve got to ask for evangelism. At Apptentive, we’ve helped leading apps dramatically boost their review volume and sentiment almost overnight simply by engaging customers with intelligent, well-timed rating prompts.

Ratings and reviews are a crucial component of any mobile marketing strategy – so much so that the difference a single star makes is often enough to bring developers ‘above the poverty line.’ We looked into the relationship between willingness-to-download and star ratings in a recent consumer survey and found that a boost from 3 to 4 stars can increase app store conversion by as much as 89% while an increase from 2 to 5 stars can increase conversion by an incredible 570%. When it comes to mobile gaming, keeping players is a big pain point for many developers and acquiring them is even harder. Do yourself a favor, and ask for the ratings and reviews to help make this all a little easier.

I hope you found these five tips helpful as you propel your app to the top of the Appstore charts and turn your player into fans. In the words of Paul Cutsinger, 40% of mobile game developers fall ‘under the poverty line.’ But then again, 40% of developers don’t have a fanbase.

Ready to Submit Your App or Game?

For more information about getting started with the Amazon App for Android, Amazon Fire devices, or how to submit your game check out the following additional resources:

 

April 22, 2015

David Isbitski

The Game Developers Conference (GDC) is the largest annual gathering of professional video game developers providing a place for the industry to collaborate, network and share best practices for creating compelling game experiences. This year Amazon hosted a full Developer Day with sessions that covered building Android games for our full line of devices, Amazon Echo, Fire Tablets, Fire TV and Fire Phone, how to build better cloud gaming experiences, reaching fans with Twitch, and applying in-app monetization best practices based on Amazon's IAP data.

These sessions were previously only available to GDC attendees, and we’re excited to announce that we’ve made all of the Amazon GDC Developer Day sessions freely available online. Enjoy!

An Overview of the Amazon Devices and Services for Game Developers
David Isbitski, Developer Evangelist, Amazon
Alf Tan, Head of Games Business Development, Amazon
Vlad Suglobov, CEO, G5 Entertainment

An overview of Amazon's current developer ecosystem.  Learn how you can take advantage of AWS services specifically targeted for Game Developers, Amazon's Appstore and the new line of consumer Fire devices like Amazon Echo, Amazon Fire TV, Fire TV Stick and Fire tablets, as well as monetization services such as in-app purchasing.  Plus, hear how G5 entertainment has had success on the Amazon platform from G5 CEO Vlad Suglobov.    

Top Tips for Porting Unity Games to Fire Devices
Jesse Freeman, Developer Evangelist, Amazon   
In this talk, we cover important tips for porting Unity games over to Fire TV, Fire tablets and Fire phone. Through code examples, we'll demo how to support multiple resolutions for pixel perfect Orthographic and Perspective Cameras, abstracting player input to support keyboard, controller and touch, and optimization tips for C# for the best performance. We'll also show how to deploy to our devices and get your game up and running on Fire OS. You'll walk away knowing what it takes to publish to the Amazon Appstore and help expand your game's user base.

How to Evolve Players into Fans
Peter Heinrich, Developer Evangelist, Amazon
We’ve analyzed the top mobile games to see what best practices make them stand out from the crowd. Several trends emerging now will amplify those best practices, and games will have more opportunity than ever to excel. In the future, the top games will have fully realized fan bases that will drive their user acquisition and engagement engines. That fan base will include players but also content creators, advocates and potential new customers — this will open up a wider range of monetization options.  Hear more about how top mobile games drive greater engagement and revenue and learn how to you can do this with your own game.

Build and Deploy Your Mobile Game with AWS
Dhruv Thukral, Gaming Solutions Architect, Amazon
Tara Walker, Technical Evangelist, Amazon 
Developing a successful mobile game today is about more than just the game:  Users expect backend services like user authentication, downloadable content, and social features. Using our AWS Mobile SDK for iOS and Android, it’s easier than ever to build a game with these services.  This session will provide a step-by-step approach to add features to your game such as user identity management, dynamic content updates, cross-platform data sync, and more.  We’ll demonstrate how to use the AWS Mobile SDK to securely interact with services such as Cognito, DynamoDB, S3, and EC2.  Finally, we’ll provide a few common architecture patterns and scalability tips for AWS game backends.

How We Made a Game No Fun
Mike Hines, Developer Evangelist, Amazon
There are lots of suggestions about how to make a game fun.  Best practices are everywhere, but you can't just follow them blindly.  To create a fun game, you have to figure out how best practices integrate into your specific game.  Watch what we did wrong, and what we learned along the way.       

Connecting with Your Customers - Building Successful Mobile Games through the Power of AWS Analytics
Nate Wiger, Principal Gaming Solutions Architect, Amazon
Free to play is now the standard for mobile and social games.  But succeeding in free-to-play is not easy:  You need in-depth data analytics to gain insight into your players so you can monetize your game.  Learn how to leverage new features of AWS services such as Elastic MapReduce, Amazon S3, Kinesis, and Redshift to build an end-to-end analytics pipeline.  Plus, we’ll show you how to easily integrate analytics with other AWS services in your game.

Deploying a Low-Latency Multiplayer Game Globally: Loadout
3:30pm-4:15pm
Nate Wiger, Principal Gaming Solutions Architect, Amazon
This is a deep-dive straight into the guts of running a low-latency multiplayer game, such as a first-person shooter, on a global scale. We dive into architectures that enable you to split apart your back-end APIs from your game servers, and Auto Scale them independently.  See how to run game servers in multiple AWS regions such as China and Frankfurt, and integrate them with your central game stack.  We’ll even demo this in action, using AWS CloudFormation and Chef to deploy Unreal Engine game servers.
 

How Game Developers Reach New Customers with Twitch
4:15pm-5:15pm
Marcus Graham, Director of Community & Education at Twitch
Ernest Le, Director Publisher & Developer Partnerships at Twitch
Twitch is the largest live video platform and community for gamers with more than 100 million visitors per month. We want to connect gamers around the world by allowing them to broadcast, watch, and chat from everywhere they play.  In this session, learn how game developers are creating engaging experiences and reaching new customers via the Twitch platform.

Amazon Fire TV Games on Twitch

Garnett Lee and Tyler Cooper hosted a steam during GDC this year on Twitch. The guys were joined by representatives from 2K games for XCOM: Enemy Within, Tellate for Game of Thrones, Ep. 2, Tripwire for Killing Floor Calamity and ended the night with Hipster Whale and a Crossy Road competition! If you are a gamer interested in seeing first-hand what the current batch of Android games looks like on the big screen be sure check out the stream here

Ready to Submit Your App or Game?

For more information about getting started with the Amazon Appstore, Amazon Fire devices, or how to submit your game check out the following additional resources:

-Dave (@TheDaveDev)

 

April 21, 2015

Paul Cutsinger

As a part of our series on helping developers turn great games into great businesses, we’ve been talking about the importance of evolving your players into a fan base. This week we’ve invited Daniel Shir to share his advice as the co-founder and CTO of Nextpeer, a platform that has helped over 7,000 game developers with discovery and retention through social features.

According to the recent data shared by Vision Mobile, roughly 50% of mobile developers are below the so called “app poverty line”, which has them making less than $500 a month. The number of apps out there is staggering, and game developers have an even harder time, with around 65% of the one million apps out there being games. That’s just the tip of the iceberg of the competitive gaming landscape that’s out there for mobile game developers.

If you’re a game developer then you base your business up on three major pillars - product, monetization and customer acquisition. To sum it all up in a brief sentence you need to make sure that you have a compelling game, a way to monetize it and a way to obtain players to play it. Let’s assume that you have an awesome game idea and that you’ve even thought of ways to monetize it, say with in-app purchases or ads. How would you go about acquiring players for your game early on and making sure that those players attract even more players? One of the best ways of going about that is to build a fan base and a community around your game.

It’s All about the Fans

Companies that do this well hit that sweet spot where the fan base acts as a sort of a perpetual motion machine, driving and pushing the game forward all by itself. We’ve all heard of the Minecraft fan base and how it propelled that game to success. The tipping point came early on for Minecraft, while the game was still in alpha. Devout fans went ahead and talked to anyone they could about how cool this game was. The end result? The game passed 1M purchases only a month into the beta phase with advertising done strictly via word of mouth.

Image by evoo73 flickr.com (under CC BY 2.0 license)

Kotaku names word of mouth as being the most persuasive factor to convince players to check out new games. Also mentioned are so called “Influence Multipliers” which are essentially gamers that are hyper connected to other gamers. According to a Waggener Edstrom Worldwide study, “Influence Multipliers” make up about 20% of the gaming audience. Think of those gamers as a central node in a huge interconnected network of gamers, it is those gamers you want to reach and persuade to become advocates for your game. It is those influencers that should become the base for your game’s community.

Getting the Ball Rolling

At Nextpeer, we’ve taken a look at a lot of successful games and analyzed what makes them tick. Sometimes simply enabling the players to communicate and share content with one another is a sure way to allow advocates to have their voice heard. Pixowl’s game, The Sandbox, does precisely that. The game itself allows the player to play a sort of mini god and create a small mini world. While the game is a lot of fun, the real ingenious propulsion engine for it comes after the player is done playing. The Sandbox enables players to share their mini created worlds and also view worlds created by others. This opens up all kinds of possibilities for advocates, for instance in educating other players and so online tutorials are created on how to create super complex worlds.

A mini world as shared by The Sandbox player Marian205 (rights owned by PIXOWL, used with permission)

Another channel that have risen in popularity lately is fan created content. Companies encourage their fans to create additional content based on the games they love. League of Legends is famous for their fan art competitions where the winners are usually rewarded with in-game items. Players feel important when they’re included in the creation process. It’s not rare to see game companies sharing live discussions with their fans whilst obtaining live feedback from them.

Yet another ingenious tactic employed by Riot Games is to reward players that invite their friends to the game with special in-game rewards and items. Some game items are impossible to come by unless you invite others to play the game. This switch in thinking turns inviting outsiders into the game to something of a badge of honor. We’ve all read about virality and how important it is, yet so many games make the mistake of not giving players a simple way to invite others. Even if an influencer loves your game and wants to share it, no one is going to do that if there’s no simple way to do it.

Communication Is Key

So what’s the best way to kickstarting your fanbase? Well the most important aspect of any fanbase if the player-to-player connection which happens around the game. The key to change a player into a fan is to give the player a way to act as a fan. Multiplayer games have this almost from the get go, since players are connected through the game itself either competitively or cooperatively. If your game is strictly designed for a single player, think about how to connect your players in other ways. If your players create or achieve something, let them share that moment in the game. Is your game a puzzle game that gets gradually harder? Let experienced players create tutorials and share tips with novices. Sometimes even having simple like a forum (with easy access from the game) is a way to get things rolling.

Creating a game all in itself is a challenging task, but building a fan base and reaching out to players makes that even more complicated. It used to be that game design, programming and graphics were all that were required to create a successful game. Nowadays, in order to succeed developers find themselves needing to understand social networking, sharing dynamics, analytics, and community management. This precisely the reason we created Nextpeer, a social service for mobile games, to take care of all those things so that game developers can focus on their game.

For more information about getting started with the Amazon Appstore and Amazon Fire devices, check out the following additional resources:

Also, if you’re in Berlin for the April 2015 International Games Week, let’s connect.

- Paul (Twitter:@PaulCutsinger | Twitch:PaulCutsinger)

 

 

 

April 13, 2015

Judith Hoffmann

  

With more than 10 events in one week, International Games Week Berlin, one of Europe’s biggest game-focused events, connects game business, technology and culture. From April 21 to 26, gaming experts will come together in Berlin, Germany, to discuss key industry trends and topics. As a sponsor of International Games Week Berlin and a premium partner at Quo Vadis, there will be plenty of opportunities to meet the Amazon Appstore team in person.

Register Now For the Amazon Developer Workshop

On Tuesday, April 21, we are hosting a free half-day developer day with Amazon’s technical evangelists Paul Cutsinger and Simon Howard. After an introduction to the Amazon Appstore, Fire TV and Fire Phone and tablets, Paul and Simon will talk to you about

  • Responsive Game Design: Bringing Desktop and Mobile Games to the Living Room
  • What the Top 50 Apps and Games Do with In-App Purchasing That the Rest of Us Don’t
  • How We Made a Game No Fun

Be sure to submit your app or game or test your APK today! Paul and Simon will be on hand during the day and throughout the week to answer your questions and get your apps live and in front of millions of customers! Register on the workshop’s Eventbrite page to secure your place!

More from Paul, More from Developers, at Quo Vadis

From April 21-23 the Amazon team will at Quo Vadis, in front of the auditorium at the Kino International. Germany’s biggest gaming conference gathered more than 2,500 visitors last year and is sure to be a success in 2015 with their fantastic speaker line-up.

  • Watch Paul Cutsinger’s talk, “How to evolve players into fans”, on April 22 and learn about best practices that make the top mobile games stand out from the crowd.
  • Make sure not to miss the indie developer showcase – find them in the dedicated Amazon developer showcase lounge.
  • Get your game on while you’re in our lounge and experience Fire TV, as well as our other devices.

Can’t make it to Games Week? Check out where the team will be next. More information on our events page.

 

April 10, 2015

Corey Badcock

In 2012, the Application Developers Alliance set out to be a resource and an advocate for developers. Today, they've amassed a global network of more than 50,000 developers and more than 200 companies that care about them. Their mission is to help developers of all kinds, everywhere. That's why they've launched their Global Developer Insights survey.

In partnership with International Data Corporation (IDC), this survey will gather information from developers all over the world. Anybody who develops software (even just some of the time) can participate. With your help, the Application Developers Alliance will build a better understanding of the opportunities and pain points for the developer community. 

With this survey, the Application Developers Alliance want to learn more about the day-to-day responsibilities of developers, how a developer fits within their organization, the tools and services that power their work, and more about what it's like to be a developer. With this information, they'll be able to better inform new companies, technology partners, service providers, and you-the global developer community-about how to improve the app ecosystem. Most importantly, we at the Application Developers Alliance will be better able to serve you!

The results will be compiled into a comprehensive Developer Insights report and distributed to members in May 2015.

 

April 07, 2015

David Isbitski

Amazon is hosting a Developer Day on April 25th at the Cross Campus in Santa Monica, California. Amazon Developer Evangelists will share industry best practices and help mobile developers learn how to grow their app business via the Amazon Appstore. Amazon technology leaders will be on-hand to answer developer questions and lead talks on topics such as building apps and games for Android devices, BlackBerry,  Fire tablets, Fire phone, Amazon Fire TV, and how to build voice controlled experiences for Amazon Echo. Attendees will also learn best practices around how to make fun games and to market your game to influencers and build a fan base.

The format of the workshop will be split between morning lectures and afternoon “App Hours.” The App Hours will allow developers to get 1:1 support to publish and tests their own apps and games to the Amazon Appstore, guidance around building apps and games with Android, Unity and Xamarin, and hands on experience with the Amazon Mobile App SDK, Fire Phone SDK, Fire TV SDK and Amazon Echo SDK code samples. Developers will also be rewarded with Amazon gift cards for successful app submissions to the Amazon Appstore during the App Hours’ time period.

Already have an Android app? Bring your APK for a chance to win cool prizes! Click here to register now!

Agenda

Check-in and Breakfast
9:30am-10:00am

An Overview of the Amazon Devices and Services for Mobile Developers
10:00am-10:45am
David Isbitski, Developer Evangelist, Amazon
We will start the day off with an overview of Amazon's current developer ecosystem. Learn how you can take advantage of Amazon’s Mobile Apps SDK, Amazon's Appstore and the new line of consumer Fire devices like Amazon Fire TV, Fire TV Stick and Fire tablets, as well as monetization services such as in-app purchasing.

Building Spoken Language Apps and Experiences for Amazon Echo
10:45am-11:45am
David Isbitski, Developer Evangelist, Amazon
Echo is a new device from Amazon designed around your voice. It's always on—just ask for information, music, news, weather, and more. Tucked under Echo's light ring is an array of seven microphones. When Echo detects the wake word, it lights up and streams audio to the cloud, where it leverages the power of Amazon Web Services to recognize and respond to your request. With the release of the developer SDK you can now build your own apps and experiences for Amazon Echo. This session will cover everything you need to know starting off with how to use the SDK, how to build your first app, and end with the app submission process.

Lunch
11:45am-12:00pm                       

How We Made a Game No Fun
12:00pm-12:45pm
Peter Heinrich, Developer Evangelist, Amazon
There are lots of suggestions about how to make a game fun.  Best practices are everywhere, but you can't just follow them blindly.  To create a fun game, you have to figure out how best practices integrate into your specific game.  Come see what we did wrong, and what we learned along the way.          

How to Evolve Players into Fans
12:45pm-1:30pm
Peter Heinrich, Developer Evangelist, Amazon
We’ve analyzed the top mobile games to see what best practices make them stand out from the crowd. Several trends emerging now will amplify those best practices, and games will have more opportunity than ever to excel. In the future, the top games will have fully realized fan bases that will drive their user acquisition and engagement engines. That fan base will include players but also content creators, advocates and potential new customers — this will open up a wider range of monetization options. Come see how top mobile games drive more engagement and revenue and learn how to you can do this with your own game.      

Break
1:30pm-1:45pm

App Hours
1:45pm-3:45pm
Get 1:1 support to publish and test apps and games to the Amazon Appstore. Learn how to build apps and games with Android, Unity and Xamarin. Get hands on experience with the Amazon Mobile App SDK, Fire Phone SDK, Fire TV SDK and Amazon Echo SDK code samples.

Raffle and Wrap-Up
3:45pm-4pm


Seating is limited so be sure to register for the event to reserve your spot. Hope to see you there!

-Dave (@TheDaveDev)

 

March 19, 2015

Corey Badcock

The Amazon Appstore launched on March 19, 2011 with 4,084 apps and games available for download on Android devices. We’ve come a long way in four years! We now have over 400,000 apps and games available globally, and the Amazon Appstore has never been available on a broader range of devices and platforms.  

The Amazon Appstore is integrated into Fire tablets, Fire TV, Fire TV Stick, and Fire phone devices, and pre-loaded on millions of Android devices globally including HTC, LG, Motorola, and Samsung phones as well as Samsung and LG tablets. The Amazon Appstore is also preloaded on BlackBerry 10 devices throughout the world, giving you access to even more customers. And the latest Amazon shopping app fully integrates apps and games into the shopping experience enjoyed by millions of customers. So when customers are searching for products in the Amazon shopping app, they’ll also discover relevant apps and games that they may also enjoy.

It’s no wonder 65% of the developers surveyed by IDC say that the Total Revenue achieved on the Fire tablet is similar to, or even better than, what they experience with other major platforms. Back in August, we announced that the Amazon Appstore is now available in 236 countries and territories, so publishing your Android app on Amazon means you reach customers from around the world.

Customers Are Getting the Gifts

Starting today and ending March 21st, Amazon Appstore is offering an app bundle, with up to $105 in top paid apps – completely free! Customers will find critically acclaimed thriller Five Nights at Freddy’s 2 – currently one of the Top Paid Apps globally. Access the full list of apps and download the Amazon Appstore at amazon.com/androidapp.

As a reminder, Amazon Appstore is offering the chance to win a $25,000 shopping spree on Amazon.com. Customers simply need to download any free or paid app from the Amazon App on their Android phone and fill out an entry form between now and April 15, 2015. They will then be eligible for a chance to win the prize of $25,000 in Amazon.com Gift Cards. Find out more and enter for a chance to win at amazon.com/appstoresweeps.*

Ready to Submit Your App or Game?

  • Click here to register for free as an Amazon Developer
  • Click here to download the Amazon Mobile SDK. 
  • Click here to submit your app

 

*NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Must be a legal resident of the 50 United States or D.C., 18 or older. Sweepstakes ends April 15, 2015. Limit one entry per person and e-mail address. See Official Rules for details and alternate method of entry.

 

March 05, 2015

Simon Howard

I recently published a blog post about how you get started using the Amazon Mobile Ads API in your Android Java based app or game. This blog is about how you do the same with an iOS app or game.

What Is the Amazon Mobile Ads API?

The Amazon Mobile Ads API allows you to monetize apps and games across the Android, Fire OS, and iOS platforms by displaying ads to customers in the US, UK, France, Italy, Spain, and Germany. Ads can be banner or interstitial and will advertise products or services coming from Amazon or other well-known brands. You are paid on ad impressions served whilst some other Ad networks only pay on clicks. To get more information on the benefits of using the Amazon Mobile Ad Network, check out the Success Stories.

How Do I get Access to the APIs?

The Amazon Mobile Ads API requires iOS 6.0 or above and Xcode 5.1.1 or above. The API is part of a single SDK (the Amazon Mobile App SDK, which you can download here) that also provides access to other Amazon mobile services and APIs such as GameCircle and In-App Purchasing.  The same download also includes the necessary files to use the API in apps developed for Android.

To use the Amazon Mobile Ads API in your Xcode projects, first download the SDK and extract the zip file to the appropriate location on your development machine. Here’s what the iOS part of the SDK folder looks like on my machine:

Obtain an Application Key

Before you can use the Amazon Mobile Ads API in an app, you should create an Application Key that is unique to the application. This key is used by the Amazon framework to identify your app so it’s essential that you use the correct one so that you will be paid. Note that if you have Android and iOS variants of the same app they must use different application keys.

To create a new key you need an Amazon Apps & Games Developer Portal account. If you don’t have one, you can create an account by visiting here. Also note, because you will be receiving income into the account, you will need to add your payment and tax information details to your developer account profile.

You can bypass this step for now if you want to just try out the API using one of the sample apps. Just make sure you create your own key (and account) later.

Check out the Samples First

Before you start including the Amazon Mobile Ads API in your project, I would recommend playing around with the samples that come with the SDK. You can find these samples in the /iOS/Ads/Samples folder and they are as follows:

SimpleAdSample,

SimpleAdUniversalSample,

SimpleAdUniversalSample_Swift

Displays a banner ad and is a good introduction to the APIs. Comes in Objective-C iPhone only, universal Objective-C and Swift versions

FloatingAdUniversalSample,

FloatingAdUniversalSample_Swift

Builds upon SimpleAdSample

InterstitialAdUniversalSample,

InterstitialAdUniversalSample_Swift

Displays a full-screen interstitial ad

Building the Samples in Xcode

Building the iOS samples in Xcode is pretty straightforward. You can import the samples as individual projects into your workspace or you can just get them all in one go by importing the workspace file (.xcworkspace extension) that is in the iOS samples root folder.

If you have imported all of the samples, you will see something similar in the Xcode projects window to the following:


Running the Samples

Once you have imported a sample, there’s nothing more to do within Xcode except to select the build option. I found that all samples build OK in the latest version (6.1.1) of Xcode at the time of writing. If for example, you run the sample FloatingAdUniversalSample you will see something similar to that shown in the screenshot below when it runs:

Including the APIs into Your Own Code

Using the Amazon Mobile Ads API in your own code is relatively straightforward and this Quick Start Guide goes through the steps that you need to follow. The following sections provide some additional tips on using the APIs.

Frameworks

At a minimum you usually need to add the Mobile Ads framework AmazonAd.framework and you may need to add any of the frameworks that are listed in the section “Incorporate the API into your project” in the Quick Start Guide if they are not referenced by your project.

The screenshot below shows the project “Build Phases” settings where the frameworks are added:


Note that you add frameworks to Swift and Objective-C projects in the same way in Xcode.

Using the APIs with Swift

The Quick Start Guide does not at the time of writing discuss the Swift version of the APIs so I thought it would be useful if I provided a quick overview in the sections below.

Amazon Mobile Ads API Swift Classes

There are 5 classes in the Swift implementation of the Amazon Mobile Ads API, which I have summarized below:

AmazonAdError

Encapsulates an error code and description relating to a particular error

AmazonAdInterstitial

Helper methods and delegate associated with creating an interstitial Ad

AmazonAdOptions

Used to define options for a particular Ad that will be loaded

AmazonAdRegistration

Used to register certain information with the Amazon Mobile Ads framework at runtime so that the app can receive Ads to display

AmazonAdView

Helper methods and delegate associated with creating a banner Ad

Setting the Application Key in Swift Code

Before your app can request an Ad, it’s essential that the app registers itself with the Amazon Mobile Ads framework. To do this, your app needs to specify the application key to the framework via the setAppKey() method in the AmazonAdRegistration class. The best place to call setAppKey() is in the application method in your app’s AppDelegate class. In this method, you should place the following call:

AmazonAdRegistration.sharedRegistration().setAppKey("123")

Where: you substitute ‘123’ with the real application key in the production version of the app.

Adding Banner Ads in Swift Code

To create a banner Ad, your app must create an instance of the AmazonAdView class in the applicable UIViewController class and then load the Ad using the loadAd() method from the AmazonAdView class. The Ad is then loaded in a separate thread (created by the framework) that will report its status via callbacks in the delegate AmazonAdViewDelegate.

The abbreviated code snippet below shows the main activities that need to be done in the app’s applicable UIViewController instance.

// Connect to the banner view control in the storyboard

    @IBOutlet var amazonBannerAd: AmazonAdView!

            override func viewDidLoad() {

      super.viewDidLoad()

      // Create a banner Ad at a given size

      amazonBannerAd = AmazonAdView(adSize: AmazonAdSize_320x50)

      // During development, you must tell the framework that the

      // app is not a production version

      var adOptions = AmazonAdOptions()

      adOptions.isTestRequest = true

      // This loads the Ad

      amazonBannerAd.loadAd(adOptions)

  // Ensure our delegate receives the callback messages

  amazonBannerAd.delegate = self

    }

For simplicity, I have hard-coded the banner size as 320 by 50 pixels in the snippet above but normally you set the Ad size using constants in the AmazonAdOptions class according to whether the app is running on an iPhone or iPad. See Mobile Ads iOS API Concepts for more details.

It is essential that during development you set the isTestRequest member of the AmazonAdOptions instance (used when loading the Ad) to true. In the production version you must set it to false.

Adding Interstitial Ads in Swift Code

To create an interstitial Ad again you create an instance of the AmazonAdInterstitial class in the applicable UIViewController instance and then load the Ad using the load() method from the AmazonAdInterstitial class. The Ad is loaded in a separate thread that will then report its status via callbacks in the delegate AmazonAdInterstitialDelegate.

The abbreviated code snippet below shows the main activities that need to be done in the app’s applicable UIViewController instance to load an interstitial Ad.

 

// Connect to the banner view control in the storyboard

    @IBOutlet var interstitialAd: AmazonAdInterstitial!

            override func viewDidLoad() {

      super.viewDidLoad()

      // Create the Ad

      InterstitialAd = AmazonAdInterstitial()

      // During development, you must tell the framework that the

      // app is not a production version

      var adOptions = AmazonAdOptions()

      adOptions.isTestRequest = true

      // Loads the Ad

      interstitialAd.load(adOptions)

  // Ensure our delegate receives the callback messages

  interstitialAd.delegate = self

    }

Debugging

During development, it’s a good idea to enable logging using the associated methods in the AmazonAdRegistration class. Doing so makes it easier for you to track the messages sent to the ad framework in Xcode. Just make sure to disable logging before launching your app to production.

In Objective-C code, a good place to enable logging is in the didFinishLaunchingWithOptions method in the AppDelegate class:

    [[AmazonAdRegistration sharedRegistration] setLogging:YES];

In Swift code, the best place to do this is in the application method in your app’s AppDelegate class:

AmazonAdRegistration.sharedRegistration().setLogging(true)

Handling Banner Ad Events in Objective-C or Swift Code

As per the Android version of the API, the Amazon Mobile Ads API enables you to hook into several events related to a banner Ad. For example, you can hook into an event that indicates that the Ad failed to load and in that case you could could determine the possible cause of the failure and if applicable choose to fill the advert using an alternative ad network.

You handle banner Ad events using callback functions that are implemented by AmazonAdViewDelegate. Here are the main functions that you might use…

viewControllerForPresentingModalView()

This callback function must be implemented and it tells the AmazonAdView class which view controller class it should use to render the Ad and also to report events.

adViewDidLoad()

Implement this callback if you want to do something when the Ad was successfully loaded.

adViewDidFailToLoad()

Implement this callback if you want to so something when an Ad failed to load successfully. You would typically determine the likely cause of the error using the error code and respond accordingly.

adViewWillExpand()

Implement this callback if you want to know when the user has tapped the Ad and it is to be displayed modally.

adViewDidCollapse()

Implement this callback if you want to know then the user has closed down an Ad that was displayed modally.

Handling Interstitial Ad Events in Objective-C or Swift Code

You can also handle events for interstitial events via callback functions that are implemented by AmazonAdInterstitialDelegate

interstitialDidLoad()

Implement this callback if you want to do something after the interstitial Ad has loaded successfully.

interstitialDidFailToLoad()

Implement this callback if you want to do something when the interstitial Ad has failed to load. Typically you would process the error code and act accordingly.

interstitialWillPresent(), interstitialDidPresent()

Implement these callbacks if you want to do something just before or after the interstitial Ad is displayed.

interstitialWillDismiss(), interstitialDidDismiss()

Implement these callbacks if you want to do something just before or after the interstitial Ad is removed from the display.

It’s worth checking out this article about event tracking and error handling. It describes how you hook into the events in Objective-C code but it’s also still very relevant for apps that have been written using Swift. Also, it’s worth stepping through the sample code so that you are clear on when the events are received.

Conclusion

It’s easy to integrate the Amazon Mobile Ads API into your iOS app or game. Doing so provides you with additional ways in which you can monetize via ads relating to products or services that come from Amazon or other well-known brands. Once you have integrated the API, you are paid for ads on impressions rather than on clicks.

Here are some more links to useful articles on using the Amazon Mobile Ads API in your iOS app:

That’s it for now. In my upcoming blogs I will discuss how you can use the Amazon Mobile Ads API in games or apps created using various frameworks, as well as provide guidelines on Ad mediation and best practices when including Mobile Ads in your app or game.

Simon Howard (@SimonH109)

 

February 19, 2015

Emily Roberts

Today, Blackberry announced their 10.3.1 OS update. As part of this update, Amazon Appstore will now be available on Android Runtime Blackberry devices that update to 10.3.1. The Amazon Appstore has never been available on a broader range of devices and platforms. Developers can reach millions of Android customers via the Amazon shopping app and on Blackberry and Fire devices. Amazon Appstore is preloaded on Fire devices, Blackberry 10 and millions of other Android devices, including HTC, LG, Motorola, and Samsung phones to name a few, as well as Gemini and Acer tablets.

Publishing your app on BlackBerry devices via the Amazon Appstore is easy. If you’re an existing Amazon Appstore developer, you've previously chosen to distribute your app or game on "Non-Amazon Devices" and your app is compatible with BlackBerry devices, you don’t have to do anything - your app is already available on BlackBerry devices.

If you’re an existing BlackBerry developer but new to the Amazon Appstore, click here to register for a free developer account. Learn how to migrate your Blackberry App to the Amazon Appstore on our blog.

 

February 19, 2015

David Isbitski

Amazon will be out at GDC San Francisco next month offering several opportunities to connect directly with you. Starting on Monday, March 2nd from 5:05pm to 5:30pm you can hear @MikeFHines talk about What Makes the Top 50 IAP Games Unique on the Amazon Appstore and lessons you can apply when generating revenue in your own games.

Then on Tuesday, March 3rd from 10am to 5:30pm we will be hosting an Amazon Developer Day covering games for Amazon Fire devices, how to build better cloud gaming experiences, reaching fans with Twitch, and applying in-app monetization best practices based on Amazon's IAP data. Technical evangelists from Amazon Appstore and AWS will be on hand to answer your questions as well as the Games Business Development team to discuss game promotion opportunities. We’ll also have devices for you to explore and test your games on, as well as a chance to win some Amazon Fire devices! Here is what the day’s agenda will look like. Click here to add a session to your GDC Scheduler.


An Overview of the Amazon Devices and Services for Game Developers
10am-10:45am

David Isbitski, Developer Evangelist, Amazon
Alf Tan, Head of Games Business Development, Amazon
Vlad Suglobov, CEO, G5 Entertainment

We will start the day off with an overview of Amazon's current developer ecosystem.  Learn how you can take advantage of AWS services specifically targeted for Game Developers, Amazon's Appstore and the new line of consumer Fire devices like Amazon Fire TV, Fire TV Stick and Fire tablets, as well as monetization services such as in-app purchasing.  Plus, hear how G5 entertainment has had success on the Amazon platform from G5 CEO Vlad Suglobov.          

Top Tips for Porting Unity Games to Fire Devices
10:45am-11:30am

Jesse Freeman, Developer Evangelist, Amazon  
In this talk, we'll cover important tips for porting Unity games over to Fire TV, Fire tablets and Fire phone. Through code examples, we'll demo how to support multiple resolutions for pixel perfect Orthographic and Perspective Cameras, abstracting player input to support keyboard, controller and touch, and optimization tips for C# for the best performance. We'll also show how to deploy to our devices and get your game up and running on Fire OS. You'll walk away knowing what it takes to publish to the Amazon Appstore and help expand your game's user base.

How to Evolve Players into Fans
11:30am-12:00pm

Peter Heinrich, Developer Evangelist, Amazon
We’ve analyzed the top mobile games to see what best practices make them stand out from the crowd. Several trends emerging now will amplify those best practices, and games will have more opportunity than ever to excel. In the future, the top games will have fully realized fan bases that will drive their user acquisition and engagement engines. That fan base will include players but also content creators, advocates and potential new customers —  this will open up a wider range of monetization options.  Come see how top mobile games drive more engagement and revenue and learn how to you can do this with your own game.

Catered Lunch
12:00-12:30pm

Build and Deploy Your Mobile Game with AWS
12:30pm-1:30pm
Dhruv Thukral, Gaming Solutions Architect, Amazon
Tara Walker, Technical Evangelist, Amazon
Developing a successful mobile game today is about more than just the game:  Users expect backend services like user authentication, downloadable content, and social features. Using our AWS Mobile SDK for iOS and Android, it’s easier than ever to build a game with these services.  This session will provide a step-by-step approach to add features to your game such as user identity management, dynamic content updates, cross-platform data sync, and more.  We’ll demonstrate how to use the AWS Mobile SDK to securely interact with services such as Cognito, DynamoDB, S3, and EC2.  Finally, we’ll provide a few common architecture patterns and scalability tips for AWS game backends.

How We Made a Game No Fun
1:30pm-2:15pm

Mike Hines, Developer Evangelist, Amazon
There are lots of suggestions about how to make a game fun.  Best practices are everywhere, but you can't just follow them blindly.  To create a fun game, you have to figure out how best practices integrate into your specific game.  Come see what we did wrong, and what we learned along the way.       

Connecting with Your Customers - Building Successful Mobile Games through the Power of AWS Analytics
2:30pm-3:30pm

Nate Wiger, Principal Gaming Solutions Architect, Amazon
Free to play is now the standard for mobile and social games.  But succeeding in free-to-play is not easy:  You need in-depth data analytics to gain insight into your players so you can monetize your game.  Learn how to leverage new features of AWS services such as Elastic MapReduce, Amazon S3, Kinesis, and Redshift to build an end-to-end analytics pipeline.  Plus, we’ll show you how to easily integrate analytics with other AWS services in your game.

Deploying a Low-Latency Multiplayer Game Globally: Loadout
3:30pm-4:15pm

Nate Wiger, Principal Gaming Solutions Architect, Amazon
This is a deep-dive straight into the guts of running a low-latency multiplayer game, such as a first-person shooter, on a global scale. We dive into architectures that enable you to split apart your back-end APIs from your game servers, and Auto Scale them independently.  See how to run game servers in multiple AWS regions such as China and Frankfurt, and integrate them with your central game stack.  We’ll even demo this in action, using AWS CloudFormation and Chef to deploy Unreal Engine game servers.

How Game Developers Reach New Customers with Twitch
4:15pm-5:15pm
Marcus Graham, Director of Community & Education at Twitch
Ernest Le, Director Publisher & Developer Partnerships at Twitch

Twitch is the largest live video platform and community for gamers with more than 100 million visitors per month. We want to connect gamers around the world by allowing them to broadcast, watch, and chat from everywhere they play.  In this session, learn game developers are creating engaging experiences and reaching new customers via the Twitch platform.

Mobile Ads Team at GDC

The Mobile Ads Team will be at GDC and has created a special offer just for attendees!

While attending GDC anyone who integrates the Amazon Mobile Ads API for the first time into their app or game will receive a $100 Amazon.com Gift Card.* The Amazon Mobile Ads API is easy to integrate and delivers highly-relevant mobile optimized ads from Amazon and brand advertisers ensuring a great experience for users. Members of the Mobile Ads team will also be on hand in booth #2429 to help you throughout the event.

Amazon Fire TV Twitch Broadcast

Then on Wednesday, March 4th we will be broadcasting live from GDC with a couple of special guests from 4pm to 7pm. The event is open to the public from 4pm to 6pm and you do not need to be a GDC pass holder to attend. Simply stop by the AWS Pop-up Loft on Market Street between 4pm to 6pm PST and join us in person for the Twitch stream.


We will be showcasing several new Amazon Fire TV games as well as interviewing the game developers who created them. Not at GDC? No worries, you will be able to watch the stream live on Twitch here from 4pm to 7pm PST.

If you’re a gamedev at GDC this will be a great opportunity for you to speak directly with Amazon Appstore, AWS and Twitch experts all in one place. Hope to see you there!

-Dave (@TheDaveDev)

*Visit exhibit #2429 for more details. Send us an email at amazon-mobile-ads@amazon.com with your Amazon Developer Portal registered email ID to qualify. Existing apps already sending ad requests do not qualify. Existing developers who integrate the Amazon Mobile Ads API into another qualified app for the first time are eligible for the offer. One Amazon.com Gift Card per participant while supplies last. Amazon.com Gift Cards ("GCs") may only be redeemed towards the purchase of eligible products on www.amazon.com GCs cannot be reloaded, resold, transferred for value, redeemed for cash or applied to any other account.  Amazon.co.uk is not responsible if a GC is lost, stolen, destroyed or used without permission.  See www.amazon.com/gc-legal for complete terms and conditions. GCs are issued by ACI Gift Cards, Inc. All Amazon ®, ™ & © are IP of Amazon.com, Inc. or its affiliates. Amazon may modify or cancel this offer at any time.

 

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