Home > Alexa > Alexa Skills Kit

Alexa Skills Kit Voice Interface and User Experience Testing for Custom Skills

Introduction

Voice interface and user experience testing focuses on:

  • Testing the user experience to ensure that the skill is aligned with several key features of Alexa that help create a great experience for customers.
  • Reviewing the intent schema, the set of sample utterances, and the list of values for any custom slot types you have defined to ensure that they are correct, complete, and adhere to voice design best practices.

    These components are defined on the Interaction Model page for your skill in the developer portal.

These tests address the following goals:

  • Increase the different ways end users can phrase requests to your skill.
  • Evaluate the ease of speech recognition when using your skill (was Alexa able to recognize the right words?)
  • Improve language understanding (when Alexa recognizes the right words, did she understand what to do?).
  • Ensure that users can speak to Alexa naturally and spontaneously.
  • Ensure that Alexa understands most requests you make, within the context of a skill’s functionality.
  • Ensure that Alexa responds to users’ requests in an appropriate way, by either fulfilling them or explaining why she can’t.

Many of these tests verify that your skill adheres to the design guidelines described in Voice Design Handbook and Design Best Practices. You may want to review those guidelines while working through this section. For recommendations for sample utterances, see Best Practices for Sample Utterances and Custom Slot Type Values.

Note that many of these tests require that you have a device for voice testing. If you do not have an Alexa-enabled device, you can use third party Alexa-enabled services, such as Echosim.io, to test your Alexa skill.

To return to the high-level testing checklist, see Certification Requirements for Custom Skills.

4.1. Session Management

Every response sent from your skill to the Alexa service includes a flag indicating whether the conversation with the user (the session) should end or continue. If the flag is set to continue, Alexa then listens and waits for the user’s response. For Amazon devices such as Amazon Echo that have a blue light ring, the device lights up to give the user a visual cue that Alexa is listening for the user’s response.

This test verifies that the text-to-speech provided by your skill and the session flag work together for a good user experience. Responses that ask questions leave the session open for a reply, while responses that fulfill the user’s request close the session.

Test Expected Results

1.

Invoke the skill without specifying an intent, for example:

  • Open <Invocation Name>.

Respond to the prompt provided by the skill and verify that you get a correct response.

After every response that asks the user a question, the session remains open and the device waits for your response.

After every response that completes the user’s request, the interaction ends.

2.

Test a variety of intents – both those that ask questions and those complete the user’s request.

After every response that asks the user a question, the session remains open and the device waits for your response.

After every response that completes the user’s request, the interaction ends.

4.2. Intent and Slot Combinations

A skill may have several intents and slots. This test verifies that each intent returns the expected response with different combinations of slots.

Test Expected Results

1.

Test the skill’s intent responses using different combinations of slot values.

You can use one of the one-shot phrases for starting the skill, for example:

  • Ask <Invocation Name> to <do something>

Be sure to invoke every intent, not just those that are typically used in a one-shot manner.

Evaluate the response for each intent

The response is appropriate for the context of the request.

For example, if the request includes a slot value, the response is relevant to that information. If a request to that same intent does not include the slot, the response uses a default or asks the user for clarification

You may want to use a table of intent and slot values to track this test and ensure that you test every intent and slot combination. For example:

Intent Slot Combination Sample Utterance to Test
IntentName SlotOne This is an utterance to test this intent and slot one
IntentName SlotTwo This is an utterance to test this intent and slot two
IntentName SlotOne
SlotTwo
This is an utterance to test this intent with both slot one and slot two
Each additional valid intent and slot combination -  

4.3. Intent Response (Design)

A good user experience for a skill depends on the skill having well-designed text-to-speech responses. The “Presenting Information to the User” section of Voice Design Best Practices provides recommendations for designing your skill’s responses. This test verifies that your skill’s responses meet these recommendations.

You can use the same set of intent and slot combinations used for the Intent and Slot Combinations test.

Test Expected Results

1.

Test the skill’s intent responses using different combinations of slot values.

You can use one of the one-shot phrases for starting the skill, for example:

  • Ask <Invocation Name> to <do something>

Be sure to invoke every intent, not just those that are typically used in a one-shot manner.

Try a variety of sample utterances for each intent.

If the skill vocalizes any examples for users to try, use those examples exactly as instructed by the skill.

Evaluate the response for each intent

The response meets each of the following requirements:

  • Answers the user’s request in a concise, terse manner.
  • Provides information in consumable chunks.
  • Does not include technical or legal jargon.
  • Responses from intents that are not typically used in a one-shot manner provide a relevant response or inform users how to begin using the skill.
  • The response is spoken in the same language used by the Alexa account. For instance, when testing with an account configured with German, the text-to-speech responses are in German. When testing with an account configured with English (US), the text-to-speech responses are in English.

For a better user experience, the response should also meet these recommendations:

  • Easy to understand
  • Written for the ear, not the eye

You can use the same set of intent and slot combinations used for the Intent Response (Intent and Slot Combinations) test.

4.4. Supportive Prompting

A user can begin an interaction with your skill without providing enough information to know what they want to do. This might be either a no intent request (the user invokes the skill but does not specify any intent at all) or a partial intent request (the user specifies the intent but does not provide the slot values necessary to fulfill the request).

In these cases, the skill must provide supportive prompts asking the user what they want to do. This test verifies that your skill provides useful prompts for these scenarios.

Test Expected Results

1.

Invoke the skill with no intent. You can do this by using a phrase that sends a LaunchRequest rather than an IntentRequest. For example:

  • Open <Invocation Name>.

Verify that you get a prompt, then respond to the prompt and verify that you get a correct response.

  • The skill prompts you for information about what you want to do.
  • The prompt includes the skill’s name so you know you are in the right place.
  • The prompt gives you specific options about what to do, but is brief. If the skill has many functions, the prompt gives the most common.
  • The prompt does not give verbose instructions telling the user what to say (such as “to do xyz, say xyz”). The prompt is concise.
  • When you respond to the prompt, the skill continues prompting until all needed information is collected, then provides a contextualized, non-error response.
  • If no information is needed from users after launch, the skill completes a core function and closes the session.

2.

Invoke the skill with a partial intent. You can do this by using a phrase that invokes the intent without including all the required slot data. For example:

  • Ask <Invocation Name> to <do something> (leave out slot data in the command)

Verify that you get a prompt, then respond to the prompt and verify that you get a correct response.

If the skill does not define any slots, you can skip this test, as it is not possible to send a partial intent.

  • The skill prompts you for the missing information.
  • The prompt gives you specific options about what to do, but is brief. If the skill has many functions, the prompt gives the most common.
  • The prompt does not give verbose instructions telling the user what to say (such as “to do xyz, say xyz”). The prompt is concise.
  • When you respond to the prompt, the skill continues prompting until all needed information is collected, then provides a contextualized, non-error response.

See Voice Design Best Practices for recommendations for designing prompts.

4.5. Invocation Name

Users say the invocation name for a skill to begin an interaction. Inspect the skill’s invocation name and verify that it meets the invocation name requirements described in Choosing the Invocation Name for a Custom Skill.

4.6. One-Shot Phrasing for Sample Utterances

Most skills provide quick, simple, “one-shot” interactions in which the user asks a question or gives a command, the skill responds with an answer or confirmation, and the interaction is complete. In these interactions, the user invokes your skill and states their intent all in a single phrase.

The ask and tell phrases are the most natural phrases for starting these types of interactions. Therefore, it is critical that you write sample utterances that work well with these phrases and are easy and natural to say.

In these tests, you review the sample utterances you’ve written for the skill, then test them by voice to ensure that they work as expected.

Test Expected Results

1.

Inspect the skill’s sample utterances to ensure that they contain the right phrasing to match the different phrases for invoking a skill with a specific intent.

Noun phrases: phrases that can follow
ask <invocation name> for …” or
tell <invocation name> about…”

  • “ask <invocation name> for my favorite color
  • “tell <invocation name> about my appointment today at 3 pm

Questions, in both interrogative and inverted forms: phrases that can follow “ask <invocation name> …”

  • “ask <invocation name> where is my car
  • “ask <invocation name> where my car is

Commands: phrases that can follow “tell <invocation name> to…” or “ask <invocation name> to…”

  • “ask <invocation name> to get me a car
  • “tell <invocation name> to find my favorite book

(In the examples above, the italic phrase is the sample utterance).

  • Noun, question, and command utterances are all included.
  • At least five varieties of these three types of phrases are present (five noun forms, five question forms, and five command forms)
  • When combined with the ask and tell phrases, the sample utterances are intuitive and natural.

2.

Launch the skill using each of the following common “ask” patterns (ideally do multiple variations for each pattern):

  • Ask <Invocation Name> for <something>
  • Ask <Invocation Name> about <something>
  • Ask <Invocation Name> to <do something>
  • Each of these common “ask” patterns works.
  • The skill successfully launches and completes the request.
  • The phrase is easy and natural to say.

3.

Launch the skill with the generic “ask” pattern (recommended test if this is a natural phrase for your skill):

  • Ask <Invocation Name> <question>

Test with questions starting with different question words (who, what, how, and so on).

The specific question words that sound natural with your skill may vary. For example, these types of questions do not flow well with “Space Geek.” A user is unlikely to say something like “Ask Space Geek what is a space fact?”

  • The generic “ask” pattern works if appropriate for your skill.
  • The skill successfully launches and completes the request.
  • The phrase is easy and natural to say.

4.

Launch the skill using the following common “tell” pattern:

  • Tell <Invocation Name> to <do something>
  • The common “tell” pattern works.
  • The skill successfully launches and completes the request.
  • The phrase is easy and natural to say.

5.

Review the “Invoking a Skill with a Specific Request (Intent)” section in Understanding How Users Invoke Custom Skills and test as many of the phrases as apply to your skill.

Note that not all of the phrases apply to all skills. For example, the “Ask…whether…” phrasing would probably not make sense for a skill asking about weather or tide information, so the skill would still pass this test even without this phrase.

  • The skill successfully launches and completes the request.
  • The phrase is easy and natural to say.

4.7. Variety of Sample Utterances

Given the flexibility and variation of spoken language in the real world, there will often be many different ways to express the same request. Therefore, your sample utterances must include multiple ways to phrase the same intent.

In this test, inspect the sample utterances for all intents, not just the “one shot” intents described in One-Shot Phrasing for Sample Utterances.

Test Expected Results

1.

Inspect the skill’s intent schema and sample utterances:

  1. For each intent, identify several ways a user could phrase a request for that intent.
  2. Verify whether the sample utterances mapped to that intent cover those phrasings.
  3. Examine any slots that appear in the sample utterances.

The five most common synonyms for phrase patterns are present. For example, if the skill contains “get me <some value>”, then the utterances include synonyms such as “give me <some value>”, “tell me <some value>”, and so on.

Each sample utterance must be unique. There cannot be any duplicate sample utterances mapped to different intents.

Each slot is used only once within a sample utterance.

4.8. Intents and Slot Types

Slots are defined with different types. Built-in types such as AMAZON.DATE convert the user’s spoken text into a different format (such as converting the spoken text “march fifth” into the date format “2017-03-05”). Custom slot types are used for items that are not covered by Amazon Alexa’s built-in types.

For this test, review the intent schema and ensure that the correct slot types are used for the type of data the slot is intended to collect.

Note that this test assumes you have migrated to the updated slot types as described in Migrating to the Improved Built-in and Custom Slot Types. If you are still using the previous version (for instance, DATE instead of AMAZON.DATE), then you need to also perform the Sample Utterances (Slot Type Values) test.

Test Expected Results

1.

Inspect the skill’s intent schema to identify all slot types.

Verify that the types match the type of data to be collected.

  • The slots for each intent match the recommended slot types listed in the Slot Types table below.
  • Slots that collect a value from a list use a custom slot type.

Slot Types:

Slot Type Use for slots that collect...

AMAZON.NUMBER

Integer numbers.

AMAZON.DATE

Relative and absolute dates (“this weekend” and “august twenty sixth twenty fifteen”).

AMAZON.TIME

The time of day (“three thirty p. m.”).

AMAZON.DURATION

A period of time (“five minutes”).

Custom Slot Types

A value from a list (horoscope signs, all NFL football teams, supported cities, recipe ingredients, and so on).

See Custom Slot Types (Values) for additional testing for your custom slot types.

AMAZON.LITERAL

Not recommended, consider replacing AMAZON.LITERAL with a custom slot type if possible.

If your schema does include AMAZON.LITERAL, also review the sample utterances and make sure that appropriate sample slot values are provided for each instance of the slot:

  • All values with a high likelihood of input
  • Appropriate distribution of word counts in the input (for instance, if only one-word values are possible, include only one-word values. If 5-6 word values are possible but rare, include only a handful of 5-6 word values).

4.9. Custom Slot Type Values

The custom slot type is used for items that are not covered by Amazon’s built-in types and is recommended for most use cases where a slot value is one of a set of possible values.

Test Expected Results

1.

Inspect the skill’s intent schema to identify all slots that use custom slot types.

For each custom slot type, review the set of values you provided for the type.

  • If possible, the list of values includes all values you expect to be used. For example, a horoscope skill with a LIST_OF_SIGNS custom type would include all twelve Zodiac signs as values for the type.
  • If the list cannot cover every possible value, it covers as many representative values as possible.
  • If the list cannot cover every possible value, the values reflect the expected word counts. For instance, if values of one to four words are possible, use values of one to four words in your value list. But also be sure to distribute them proportionally. If a four-word value occurs in an estimated 10% of inputs, then include four-word values only in 10% of the values in your list.
  • All custom values are written in the selected language. For instance, all custom slot type values on the German tab must be in German.

For guidelines for defining custom slot type values, see Recommendations for Custom Slot Type Values.

4.10. Writing Conventions for Sample Utterances

Sample utterances must be written according to defined rules in order to successfully build a speech model for your skill.

Test Expected Results

1.

Review the text of all sample utterances.

All sample utterances adhere to the following
writing conventions:

  • Capital letters and punctuation are not used (periods can be used, but only in initialisms and spelling (e.g. “t. v.”). Hyphens can be used, but should be very infrequent. Apostrophes can be used in possessives).
  • Individual letters are followed by a period and a space before the next letter or word: “TV” is written as “t. v.”, “OK” is written as “o. k.”- Compounds are written similarly: “AccessHD” is written as “access h. d.”
  • The invocation name must not appear in isolation or within supported launch phrasing. For example, a skill with the invocation name “Daily Horoscopes”cannot contain any sample utterances that are just “daily horoscopes” or sample utterances containing launch phrases such as “tell daily horoscopes.”For a complete list of launch phrases see Understanding How Users Invoke Custom Skills.
  • All sample utterances are written in the selected language. For instance, the sample utterances on the German tab must be in German.

For more information about syntax rules for sample utterances, see the Custom Interaction Model Reference .

4.11. Error Handling

Unlike a visual interface, where the user can only interact with the objects presented on the screen, there is no way to limit what users can say in a speech interaction. Your skill needs to handle a variety of errors in an intelligent and user-friendly way. This test verifies your skill’s ability to handle common errors.

For more information on validating user input, please see Handling Possible Input Errors.

Test Expected Results

1.

Invoke the skill without specifying an intent, for example:

  • Open <Invocation Name>.

When prompted to respond, say nothing.

  • The skill responds with a prompt that clarifies the information you need to provide.
  • The prompt clearly indicates what you need to say.
  • The prompt ends with a question and keeps the session open for your response.

Note that in this scenario, the prompt you hear is the re-prompt included in the previous response.

2.

Invoke the skill using the following phrase:

  • Open <Invocation Name>.

When prompted to respond, say something that matches one of your skill’s intents, but with invalid slot data.

For instance, if the intent expects an AMAZON.DATE slot, say something that cannot be converted to a date.

Repeat this test for each slot.

  • The skill responds with a prompt or help text that clarifies the information you need to provide.
  • The prompt clearly indicates what you need to say.
  • The prompt ends with a question and keeps the session open for your response.

Note that in this scenario, the prompt is not the re-prompt included in the previous response. This prompt must come from error handling within the code that handles the intent.

4.12. Providing Help

A skill must have a help intent that can provide additional instructions for navigating and using the skill. Implement the AMAZON.HelpIntent to provide this. You do not need to provide your own sample utterances for this intent, but you do need to implement it in the code for your skill. For details, see Implementing the Built-in Intents.

This test verifies that this intent exists and provides useful information.

Test Expected Results

1.

Invoke the skill without specifying an intent, for example:

  • Open <Invocation Name>.

When prompted to respond, say “help”.

For a simple skill that gives a complete response even with no specific intent, (such as the Space Geek sample), invoke the help intent directly:

  • Ask <Invocation Name> for help.

The help response:

  • Provides instructions to help the user navigate the skill’s core functionality.
  • Is more informative than the prompt users hear when launching the skill with no intent. For example, the help prompt could explain more about what the skill does or inform users how to exit the skill.
  • Educates users on what the skill can do, as opposed to what they need to say in order for the skill to function.
  • Ends with a question prompting the user to complete their request.
  • Leaves the session open to get a response from the user.

For more about designing help for your skill, see the “Offer Help for Complex Skills” section of Voice Design Best Practices.

4.13. Stopping and Canceling

Your skill must respond appropriately to common utterances for stopping and canceling actions (such as “stop,” “cancel,” “never mind,” and others). The built-in AMAZON.StopIntent and AMAZON.CancelIntent intents provide these utterances. In most cases, these intents should just exit the skill, but you can map them to alternate functionality if it makes sense for your particular skill. See Implementing the Built-in Intents.

Test Expected Results

1.

Start the skill and invoke an intent that prompts the user for a response.

After hearing the prompt, say “stop.”

One of the following occurs:

  • The skill exits.
  • The skill returns a response that is appropriate to the skill’s functionality. The response also makes sense in the context of the request to “stop.” For example, a skill that places orders could send back a reply confirming that the user’s order has been canceled.

If the skill responds to all requests with a complete response and never provides a prompt, skip this test.

2.

Invoke an intent that responds with lengthy text-to-speech. As soon as Alexa begins speaking the response, say “Alexa, stop” to interrupt the response.

After the wake word interrupts Alexa, one of the following occurs.

  • The skill exits.
  • The skill returns a response that is appropriate to the skill’s functionality. The response also makes sense in the context of the request to “stop.” For example, a skill that places orders could send back a reply confirming that the user’s order has been canceled.

If all of the skill’s responses are too short to reasonably interrupt, skip this test.

3.

Start the skill and invoke an intent that prompts the user for a response.

After hearing the prompt, say “cancel.”

One of the following occurs:

  • The skill exits.
  • The skill returns a response that is appropriate to the skill’s functionality. The response also makes sense in the context of the request to “cancel.” For example, a skill that places orders could send back a reply confirming that the user’s order has been canceled.

If the skill responds to all requests with a complete response and never provides a prompt, skip this test.

4.

Invoke an intent that responds with lengthy text-to-speech. As soon as Alexa begins speaking the response, say “Alexa, cancel” to interrupt the response.

After the wake word interrupts Alexa, one of the following occurs.

  • The skill exits.
  • The skill returns a response that is appropriate to the skill’s functionality. The response also makes sense in the context of the request to “cancel.” For example, a skill that places orders could send back a reply confirming that the user’s order has been canceled.

If all of the skill’s responses are too short to reasonably interrupt, skip this test.

5.

Invoke any intent that starts the skill session. While the session is open, say “Exit.” This ends the session and sends your skill a SessionEndedRequest.

The skill closes without returning an error response.

Appendix: Deprecated Test for Sample Utterances (Slot Type Values)

If all of your slots use the newer slot types with the AMAZON namespace (such as AMAZON.DATE), you do not need to do this test.

In previous versions of the Alexa Skills Kit, it was necessary to include slot values showing different ways of phrasing the slot data in your sample utterances. For example, sample utterances for a DATE slot were written like this:

OneshotTideIntent when is high tide on {january first|Date}
OneshotTideIntent when is high tide {tomorrow|Date}
OneshotTideIntent when is high tide {saturday|Date}
...(many more utterances showing different ways to say the date)

If your skill still uses this syntax for the built-in slot types, you need to review the sample slot values in your sample utterances. We strongly recommend migrating to the updated slot types that no longer require the sample values.

Test Expected Results

1.

Inspect the skill’s intent schema to identify all slot types, then inspect the slot type values found in the sample utterances.

Verify that the slot type values provide sufficient variety for good recognition.

  • NUMBER: provide multiple ways of stating integer numbers, and include samples showing the full range of numbers you expect (for example, include “ten, “one hundred”, and several samples in between). If you expect the numbers used to only be within a small range, include every number within that range as a sample value in an utterance.
  • DATE: provide both relative and absolute date samples (for example, “today”, “tomorrow”, “september first”, “june twenty sixth twenty fifteen”). If you expect a certain set of phrases to be more likely than others, include samples of those phrases.
  • TIME: provide samples of stating the time (“three thirty p. m.”).
  • DURATION: provide samples of indicating different time periods (“five minutes”, “ten days”, “four years”).
  • LITERAL: see recommendations for AMAZON.LITERAL, above. The LITERAL and AMAZON.LITERAL slot types work the same way.

Next Steps

Testen der Sprachschnittstelle und der Benutzererfahrung für einen Alexa-Skill

Einleitung

Das Testen der Sprachschnittstelle sowie der Benutzererfahrung fokussiert sich auf Folgendes:

  • Das Testen der Benutzererfahrung gewährleistet, dass der Skill auf mehrere wichtige Funktionen von Alexa abgestimmt ist, die für eine großartige Erfahrung beim Kunden sorgen.
  • Das Prüfen des Absichtsschemas, die Reihe der Beispieläußerungen und die Liste der Werte für benutzerdefinierte Slot-Typen, die Sie definiert haben, um sicherzustellen, dass sie korrekt sind, vervollständigen und respektieren die Best Practices für das Voice Design.

    Diese Komponenten werden auf der Seite Interaktionsmodell für Ihren Skill im Entwicklerportal definiert.

Die Tests verfolgen diese Ziele:

  • Anzahl der Möglichkeiten erhöhen, mit denen Endbenutzer sich an Ihren Skill wenden können.
  • Die Leichtigkeit der Spracherkennung beim Benutzen Ihres Skills beurteilen (konnte Alexa die richtigen Wörter erkennen?)
  • Sprachverständnis verbessern (Wenn Alexa die richtigen Wörter erkannt hat, hat sie auch verstanden, was sie tun soll?).
  • Sicherstellen, dass die Benutzer natürlich und spontan zu Alexa sprechen können.
  • Sicherstellen, dass Alexa die meisten Ihrer Anfragen innerhalb des Kontexts der Funktionen Ihres Skills versteht.
  • Sicherstellen, dass Alexa angemessen auf Benutzeranfragen reagiert, indem sie sie entweder ausführt oder erklärt, warum sie sie nicht ausführen kann.

In vielen dieser Tests wird geprüft, ob Ihr Skill sich an das Voice Design-Handbuch und die Best Practices für Voice Design hält. Sie müssen diese Leitfäden zurate ziehen, während Sie diesen Abschnitt durcharbeiten. Empfehlungen für Beispieläußerungen finden Sie unter Definieren der Sprachschnittstelle.

Beachten Sie, dass Sie für viele dieser Tests ein Gerät für Sprachtests benötigen. Falls Sie kein Gerät haben, das den Alexa-Dienst unterstützt, können Sie Services anderer Anbieter verwenden, die den Alexa-Dienst unterstützen, etwa Echosim.io, um Ihren Alexa-Skill zu testen.

Die allgemeine Test-Checkliste finden Sie unter Zertifizierungsanforderungen für benutzerdefinierte Skills.

4.1. Sitzungsmanagement

Jede Antwort, die von Ihrem Skill zum Alexa-Dienst gesendet wird, beinhaltet eine Markierung, die darauf hinweist, ob die Konversation mit dem Benutzer (die Sitzung) beendet oder fortgeführt werden soll. Wenn die Markierung auf "Fortführen" gesetzt ist, hört Alexa zu und wartet auf die Reaktion des Benutzers.Bei Amazon-Geräten, wie etwa dem Amazon Echo mit einem blauen Lichtring, leuchtet das Gerät auf, damit der Benutzer einen visuellen Hinweis erhält, dass Alexa auf eine Reaktion vom Benutzer wartet.

Bei diesem Test wird geprüft, ob die Umwandlung von Text in Sprache von Ihrem Skill und die Sitzungsmarkierung zusammenarbeiten, damit eine zufriedenstellende Benutzererfahrung erreicht wird. Reaktionen, bei denen Fragen gestellt werden, lassen eine Sitzung offen, damit geantwortet werden kann. Reaktionen, die die Benutzeranfrage beantworten, schließen die Sitzung.

Test Erwartete Ergebnisse

1.

Skill aufrufen, ohne eine Absicht zu äußern, zum Beispiel:

  • Öffne <Aufrufsname>.

Auf die Aufforderung des Skills reagieren und prüfen, ob die Reaktion richtig ist.

Nach jeder Reaktion, die dem Benutzer eine Frage stellt, bleibt die Sitzung geöffnet und das Gerät wartet auf Ihre Reaktion.

Nach jeder Reaktion, die die Benutzeranfrage beantwortet, endet die Interaktion.

2.

Eine Reihe von Absichten testen, sowohl solche, in denen Fragen gestellt werden, als auch solche, die die Benutzeranfrage beantworten.

Nach jeder Reaktion, die dem Benutzer eine Frage stellt, bleibt die Sitzung geöffnet und das Gerät wartet auf Ihre Reaktion.

Nach jeder Reaktion, die die Benutzeranfrage beantwortet, endet die Interaktion.

4.2. Absichts- und Slot-Kombinationen

Ein Skill kann mehrere Absichten und Slots haben.In diesem Test wird geprüft, ob jede einzelne Absicht bei verschiedenen Slot-Kombinationen die erwartete Reaktion zurückgibt.

Test Erwartete Ergebnisse

1.

Testen Sie die Absichtsreaktionen des Skills mit verschiedenen Kombinationen von Slot-Werten.

Sie können einen der One-shot-Sätze zum Starten des Skills verwenden, zum Beispiel:

  • Bitte <Aufrufsname>, <etwas zu tun>

Achten Sie darauf, jede Absicht aufzurufen, nicht nur jene, die normalerweise in One-shot-Manier verwendet werden.

Die Reaktion auf jede einzelne Absicht beurteilen

Die Reaktion ist für den Kontext der Anfrage angemessen.

Zum Beispiel wenn die Anfrage einen Slot-Wert enthält, ist die Reaktion für diese Information relevant.Wenn eine Anfrage für dieselbe Absicht den Slot nicht enthält, verwendet die Reaktion einen Standardwert oder bittet den Benutzer um Klärung.

Sie sollten eine Tabelle mit Absichten und Slot-Werten verwenden, um diesen Test zu verfolgen und sicherzustellen, dass Sie alle Absichts- und Slot-Kombinationen testen. Zum Beispiel:

Absicht Slot-Kombination Zu testende Beispieläußerung
IntentName SlotOne Diese ist eine Äußerung zum Testen von dieser Absicht und von Slot eins.
IntentName SlotTwo Diese ist eine Äußerung zum Testen von dieser Absicht und von Slot zwei.
IntentName SlotOne
SlotTwo
Diese ist eine Äußerung zum Testen von dieser Absicht sowie von Slot eins und Slot zwei
Jede weitere gültige Absichts- und Slot-Kombination -

4.3. Absichtsreaktion (Design)

Eine gute Benutzererfahrung für einen Skill ist abhängig davon, dass der Skill gut konzipierte Text-zu-Sprache-Reaktionen umfasst. Im Abschnitt „Präsentieren von Informationen für den Benutzer“ von Best Practices für Voice Design finden Sie Empfehlungen zum Konzipieren der Reaktionen Ihres Skills. In diesem Test wird überprüft, ob die Reaktionen Ihres Skills diesen Empfehlungen entsprechen.

Sie können die gleichen Absichts- und Slot-Kombinationen wie für den Test der Absichts- und Slot-Kombinationen verwenden.

Test Erwartete Ergebnisse

1.

Testen Sie die Reaktionen des Skills auf die Absichten mit verschiedenen Slot-Werten.

Sie können einen der One-shot-Sätze zum Starten des Skills verwenden, zum Beispiel:

  • Bitte <Aufrufsname>, <etwas zu tun>

Achten Sie darauf, jede einzelne Absicht aufzurufen, nicht nur jene, die normalerweise in One-shot-Manier verwendet werden.

Testen Sie verschiedene Beispieläußerungen für jede einzelne Absicht.

Wenn der Skill Beispiele vokalisiert, die die Benutzer ausprobieren sollen, verwenden Sie diese genau gemäß den Anweisungen des Skills.

Bewerten Sie die Reaktion auf jede einzelne Absicht.

Die Reaktion erfüllt jede der folgenden Anforderungen:

  • Beantwortet die Anfrage des Benutzers kurz und knapp.
  • Liefert Informationen in praktischen Einheiten.
  • Verwendet weder technischen noch juristischen Jargon.
  • Reaktionen auf Absichten, die normalerweise nicht in One-shot-Manier verwendet werden, liefern eine relevante Reaktion oder informieren die Benutzer darüber, wie sie den Skill starten können.

Für eine bessere Erfahrung sollte die Reaktion auch diesen Empfehlungen entsprechen:

  • Einfach zu verstehen
  • Für die Ohren geschrieben, nicht für die Augen

Sie können die gleichen Absichts- und Slot-Kombinationen wie für den Test Absichtsreaktion (Absichts- und Slot-Kombinationen) verwenden.

4.4. Unterstützende Aufforderungen

Ein Benutzer kann eine Interaktion mit Ihrem Skill beginnen, ohne ausreichende Informationen über die erwartete Handlung anzubieten. Dies kann entweder eine Anfrage ohne Absicht sein (der Benutzer ruft den Skill auf, äußert jedoch keine Absicht), oder eine Anfrage mit Teilabsicht (der Benutzer äußert die Absicht, jedoch keine Slot-Werte, die erforderlich sind, um die Anfrage auszuführen).

In diesen Fällen muss der Skill unterstützende Aufforderungen anbieten, die den Benutzer fragen, was er tun möchte. Bei diesem Test wird geprüft, ob Ihr Skill nützliche Aufforderungen für diese Szenarien anbietet.

Test Erwartete Ergebnisse

1.

Rufen Sie den Skill ohne Absicht auf. Sie können dies mit einem Satz tun, der eine LaunchRequest sendet und keine IntentRequest. Zum Beispiel:

  • Öffne <Aufrufsname>.

Vergewissern Sie sich, dass Sie eine Aufforderung erhalten, reagieren Sie auf diese Aufforderung und prüfen Sie, ob Sie eine korrekte Reaktion erhalten.

  • Der Skill bittet Sie um Informationen darüber, was Sie tun möchten.
  • Die Aufforderung enthält den Namen des Skills, damit Sie wissen, dass Sie sich am richtigen Ort befinden.
  • Die Aufforderung liefert spezifische Optionen darüber, was zu tun ist, fasst sich jedoch kurz. Wenn der Skill mehrere Funktionen hat, gibt die Aufforderung die gängigste an.
  • Die Aufforderung gibt keine wortreichen Anweisungen dazu, was der Benutzer sagen soll (wie etwa „um xyz zu tun, sagen Sie xyz“). Die Aufforderung ist kurz.
  • Wenn Sie auf die Aufforderung reagieren, äußert der Skill weitere Aufforderungen, bis alle benötigten Informationen gesammelt wurden, und liefert dann eine kontextbezogene Reaktion ohne Fehler.
  • Wenn nach dem Starten keine Informationen vom Benutzer benötigt werden, führt der Skill eine Kernfunktion aus und schließt die Sitzung.

2.

Rufen Sie den Skill mit einer Teilabsicht auf. Dies können Sie mithilfe eines Satzes ausführen, der die Absicht aufruft, jedoch nicht alle erforderlichen Slot-Daten enthält. Zum Beispiel:

  • Bitte <Aufrufsname>, <etwas zu tun> (keine Slot-Daten im Befehl)

Vergewissern Sie sich, dass Sie eine Aufforderung erhalten, reagieren Sie auf diese Aufforderung und prüfen Sie, ob Sie eine korrekte Reaktion erhalten.

Wenn der Skill keine Slots definiert, können Sie diesen Test überspringen, weil es nicht möglich ist, eine Teilabsicht zu senden.

  • Der Skill fordert Sie auf, die fehlenden Informationen anzugeben.
  • Die Aufforderung enthält spezifische Optionen über das, was zu tun ist, ist jedoch kurz. Wenn der Skill viele Funktionen hat, beinhaltet die Aufforderung die gängigste.
  • Der Skill gibt keine wortreichen Anweisungen, die dem Benutzer mitteilen, was er sagen soll (wie etwa „um xyz zu tun, müssen Sie xyz sagen“). Die Aufforderung ist kurz.
  • Wenn Sie auf die Aufforderung reagieren, gibt der Skill weitere Aufforderungen, bis er alle benötigten Informationen gesammelt hat, dann gibt er eine kontextbezogene Reaktion ohne Fehler.

Unter Best Practices für Voice Design finden Sie Empfehlungen zum Konzipieren von Aufforderungen.

4.5. Aufrufsname

Die Benutzer sprechen den Aufrufsnamen für einen Skill aus, um eine Interaktion zu beginnen. Prüfen Sie den Aufrufsnamen gemäß Auswählen eines Aufrufsnamens für einen benutzerdefinierten Skill.

4.6. One-shot-Sätze für Beispieläußerungen

Die meisten Skills bieten schnelle, einfache "One-shot"-Interaktionen, in denen der Benutzer eine Frage stellt oder einen Befehl gibt. Der Skill reagiert mit einer Antwort oder Bestätigung und die Interaktion ist abgeschlossen.In diesen Interaktionen ruft der Benutzer Ihren Skill auf und äußert seine Absicht in nur einem Satz.

Frage- und Sage-Sätze sind die natürlichsten Sätze zum Starten dieser Art von Interaktionen. Deshalb ist es von entscheidender Bedeutung, dass Sie Beispieläußerungen schreiben, die gut mit diesen Sätzen funktionieren und sich einfach und natürlich aussprechen lassen.

In diesen Tests prüfen Sie die Beispieläußerungen, die Sie für den Skill geschrieben haben, dann testen Sie diese mit der Stimme, um sicherzustellen, dass sie wie erwartet funktionieren.

Test Erwartete Ergebnisse

1.

Prüfen Sie die Beispieläußerungen des Skills, um sicherzustellen, dass er die richtige Formulierung enthält, die mit den verschiedenen Sätzen zum Aufrufen eines Skills mit einer spezifischen Absicht übereinstimmen.

Substantivsätze: Sätze, die auf diese Äußerungen folgen können
Bitte < Aufrufsname> um …“ oder
Erzähle < Aufrufsname> über…”

  • „Frage <Aufrufsname> nach meiner Lieblingsfarbe
  • „Sage < Aufrufsname>, dass ich heute um 15 Uhr einen Termin habe

Fragen mit Fragewort oder umgekehrter Satzstellung: Sätze nach Frage <Aufrufsname> …“

  • „Frage <Aufrufsname> wo ist mein Auto
  • „Frage <Aufrufsname>, wo mein Auto ist

Befehle: Sätze, die folgen können nach „Sage <Aufrufsname>, zu …“ oder „Bitte < Aufrufsname>, zu …“

  • „Bitte < Aufrufsname>, mir ein Auto zu besorgen
  • „Sage <Aufrufsname>, mein Lieblingsbuch zu suchen

(In den obigen Beispielen sind die kursiv gedruckten Sätze Beispieläußerungen).

  • Substantiv-, Fragewort- und Befehlsäußerungen werden alle einbezogen.
  • Mindestens fünf Varianten dieser drei Satztypen sind vorhanden (fünf Substantivformen, fünf Fragewortformen und fünf Befehlsformen)
  • Die Beispieläußerungen sind intuitiv und natürlich, wenn sie mit den Frage- und Sage-Sätzen kombiniert werden.

2.

Starten Sie den Skill mit jedem der folgenden gängigen Frage-Beispiele (wenden Sie nach Möglichkeit mehrere Varianten für jedes Beispiel an):

  • Frage <Aufrufsname> nach <etwas>
  • Frage <Aufrufsname> über < etwas>
  • Bitte <Aufrufsname>, <etwas zu tun>
  • Jedes dieser allgemeinen Frage-Beispiele funktioniert.
  • Der Skill wird erfolgreich gestartet und führt die Anfrage aus.
  • Der Satz lässt sich einfach und natürlich aussprechen.

3.

Starten Sie den Skill mit dem allgemeinen Frage-Beispiel (empfohlener Test um festzustellen, ob dies für Ihren Skill ein natürlicher Satz ist):

  • Frage <Aufrufsname> <Frage>

Testen Sie mit Fragen, die mit verschiedenen Fragewörtern beginnen (wer, was, wie usw.).

Die Fragewörter, die mit Ihrem Skill natürlich klingen, können variieren. Diese Fragetypen fließen zum Beispiel nicht gut mit „Space Geek“. Ein Benutzer wird wahrscheinlich nicht sagen „Frage Space Geek, was ein Weltraumfakt ist?“

  • Das allgemeine Fragemuster funktioniert, wenn es für Ihren Skill geeignet ist.
  • Der Skill wird erfolgreich gestartet und führt die Anfrage aus.
  • Der Satz lässt sich einfach und natürlich aussprechen.

4.

Starten Sie den Skill mit den folgenden allgemeinen Sage-Beispielen:

  • Sage <Aufrufsname>, <etwas zu tun>
  • Das allgemeine Sage-Beispiel funktioniert.
  • Der Skill wird erfolgreich gestartet und führt die Anfrage aus.
  • Der Satz lässt sich einfach und natürlich aussprechen.

5.

Lesen Sie nochmals den Abschnitt „Einen Skill mit einer spezifischen Anfrage starten (Absicht)“ in Wie Benutzer benutzerdefinierte Skills aufrufen und testen Sie so viele Sätze wie möglich, die zu Ihrem Skill passen.

Beachten Sie, dass nicht alle Sätze zu allen Skills passen. Der Satz „Frage…, ob…“ würde wahrscheinlich nicht zum Wattläufer passen, obwohl der Skill diesen Test auch ohne diesen Satz bestehen würde.

  • Der Skill wird erfolgreich gestartet und führt die Anfrage aus.
  • Der Satz lässt sich einfach und natürlich aussprechen.

4.7. Vielfalt der Beispieläußerungen

Angesichts der Flexibilität und der Vielfalt der gesprochenen Sprache kann dieselbe Anforderung oft auf sehr unterschiedliche Weise ausgedrückt werden. Deshalb müssen ihre Beispieläußerungen mehrere Möglichkeiten umfassen, die gleiche Absicht zu formulieren.

Prüfen Sie in diesem Test die Beispieläußerungen für alle Absichten, nicht nur die "One-shot"-Absichten in One-shot-Sätzen für Beispieläußerungen.

Test Erwartete Ergebnisse

1.

Prüfen Sie das Absichtsschema und die Beispieläußerungen des Skills:

  1. Suchen Sie für jede Absicht mehrere Möglichkeiten, wie der Benutzer eine Anfrage für diese Absicht formulieren könnte.
  2. Prüfen Sie, ob die Beispieläußerungen, die dieser Absicht zugeordnet wurden, diese Formulierungen abdecken.
  3. Prüfen Sie alle Slots, die in den Beispieläußerungen vorkommen.

Jeder Anfragetyp enthält mindestens fünf verschiedene Beispieläußerungen (für einfache Absichten). Mehr Äußerungen einzubeziehen, erhöht die Präzision Ihres Skills.

Die fünf gängigsten Synonyme für Satzmuster sind vorhanden. Wenn der Skill zum Beispiel „Hol mir <einen Wert>“ enthält, umfassen die Äußerungen Synonyme wie „Gib mir <einen Wert>“, „Sage mir <einen Wert>“ usw.

Jede Beispieläußerung muss eindeutig sein. Beispieläußerungen dürfen nicht mehrfach vorkommen und unterschiedlichen Absichten zugeordnet sein.

Jeder im Absichtsschema definierte Slot muss in mindestens einer Beispieläußerung vorkommen.

Jeder Slot wird nur einmal innerhalb einer Beispieläußerung verwendet.

4.8. Absichten und Slot-Typen

Slots werden mit verschiedenen Typen definiert. Integrierte Typen wie AMAZON.DATE konvertieren den gesprochenen Text eines Benutzers in ein anderes Format (etwa den gesprochenen Text „fünfter März“ in das Datumsformat „2017-03-05). Benutzerdefinierte Slot-Typen werden für Elemente verwendet, die nicht von den integrierten Typen von Amazon Alexa abgedeckt sind.

Prüfen Sie für diesen Test das Absichtsschema und vergewissern Sie sich, dass die richtigen Slot-Typen für den Datentyp verwendet werden, den der Slot sammeln soll.

Beachten Sie, dass dieser Test davon ausgeht, dass Sie zu den aktualisierten Slot-Typen migriert haben, die unter Migration zu den verbesserten integrierten und benutzerdefinierten Slot-Typen beschrieben sind. Wenn Sie noch die vorherige Version verwenden (zum Beispiel DATE anstelle von AMAZON.DATE), müssen Sie außerdem den Test Beispieläußerungen (Slot-Typ-Werte) durchführen.

Test Erwartete Ergebnisse

1.

Prüfen Sie das Absichtsschema des Skills, um alle Slot-Typen zu ermitteln.

Prüfen Sie, ob die Typen mit dem zu sammelnden Datentyp übereinstimmen.

  • Die Slots für jede einzelne Absicht stimmen mit den empfohlenen Slot-Typen in der Tabelle Slot-Typen weiter unten überein.
  • Slots, die einen Wert aus einer Liste sammeln, verwenden einen benutzerdefinierten Slot-Typ.

Slot-Typen:

Slot-Typ Für Slots verwenden, die… sammeln
AMAZON.NUMBER Ganzzahlen
AMAZON.DATE Relative und absolute Daten („dieses Wochenende“ und „sechsundzwanzigster August zweitausendfünfzehn“)
AMAZON.TIME Die Tageszeit („fünfzehn Uhr dreißig“)
AMAZON.DURATION Eine Zeitdauer („fünf Minuten“)
Benutzerdefinierte Slot-Typen Ein Wert aus einer Liste (Sternzeichen, alle Bundesligateams, unterstützte Städte, Rezeptzutaten usw.)

Unter Benutzerdefinierte Slot-Typen (Werte) finden Sie weitere Tests für Ihre benutzerdefinierten Slot-Typen.

4.9. Benutzerdefinierte Slot-Typ-Werte

Der benutzerdefinierte Slot-Typ wird für Elemente verwendet, die nicht von den integrierten Amazon-Typen abgedeckt sind. Sie werden für die meisten Fälle empfohlen, wo ein Slot-Wert zu einer Reihe möglicher Werte gehört.

Test Erwartete Ergebnisse

1.

Prüfen Sie das Absichtsschema des Skills, um alle Slots ausfindig zu machen, die benutzerdefinierte Slot-Typen verwenden.

Prüfen Sie für jeden benutzerdefinierten Slot-Typ den Wertesatz, den Sie für den Typ angegeben haben.

  • Falls möglich umfasst die Liste alle Werte, die Ihrer Meinung nach verwendet werden können. Ein Horoskop-Skill mit dem benutzerdefinierten Typ LIST_OF_SIGNS würde beispielsweise alle zwölf Sternzeichen als Werte für den Typ enthalten.
  • Wenn die Liste nicht jeden einzelnen möglichen Wert abdecken kann, deckt sie so viele repräsentative Werte wie möglich ab.
  • Wenn die Liste nicht jeden einzelnen möglichen Wert abdecken kann, bringen die Werte die erwartete Wortanzahl zum Ausdruck. Wenn beispielsweise Werte von einem bis vier Wörtern möglich sind, verwenden Sie Werte von einem bis vier Wörtern in Ihrer Wertliste. Achten Sie auch darauf, sie gleichmäßig zu verteilen. Wenn ein Wert aus vier Wörtern in rund 10 % der Eingaben vorkommt, verwenden Sie Werte mit vier Wörtern nur in 10 % der Werte in Ihrer Liste.

Einen Leitfaden zum Definieren der Werte für benutzerdefinierte Slot-Typen finden Sie im Abschnitt „Empfehlungen zum Definieren der Spracheingabedaten“ unter Definieren der Sprachschnittstelle.

4.10. Schreibkonventionen für Beispieläußerungen

Beispieläußerungen müssen gemäß den festgelegten Regeln geschrieben werden, um ein Sprachmodell für Ihren Skill erfolgreich aufzubauen.

Test Erwartete Ergebnisse

1.

Prüfen Sie den Text aller Beispieläußerungen.

Alle Beispieläußerungen entsprechen den folgenden
Schreibkonventionen:

  • Es werden weder Großbuchstaben noch Satzzeichen verwendet (Punkte können verwendet werden, jedoch nur für Initiale und Schreibweisen (z. B. „t. v.“). Bindestriche können verwendet werden, jedoch nur ausnahmsweise. Apostrophe können für Possessivausdrücke verwendet werden).
  • Ein Punkt kann nach Einzelbuchstaben stehen. Vor dem nächsten Buchstaben oder Wort steht eine Leerstelle: „TV“ wird „t. v.“ geschrieben „OK“ als „o. k.“ - Wortzusammensetzungen werden auf ähnliche Weise geschrieben: „AccessHD“ wird als „access h. d.“ geschrieben
  • Der Aufrufsname darf weder isoliert noch innerhalb des unterstützten Startausdrucks erscheinen. Ein Skill mit dem Aufrufsnamen „Horoskop Dienst“ darf keine Beispieläußerungen enthalten, die nur „Horoskop Dienst“ lauten. Beispieläußerungen dürfen keine Startausdrücke wie „Sag Horoskop Dienst“ enthalten. Eine vollständige Liste der Startausdrücke finden Sie unter Wie Benutzer benutzerdefinierte Skills aufrufen

Weitere Informationen über die Syntaxregeln für Beispieläußerungen finden Sie unter Referenz für das benutzerdefinierte Interaktionsmodell .

4.11. Umgang mit Fehlern

Anders als bei einer visuellen Schnittstelle, wo der Benutzer nur mit auf dem Bildschirm dargestellten Objekten interagieren kann, gibt es hier keine Möglichkeit einzuschränken, was die Benutzer in einer Sprachinteraktion sagen können.Ihr Skill muss auf intelligente und benutzerfreundliche Weise mit einer Vielzahl von Fehlern umgehen können. In diesem Test wird geprüft, wie Ihr Skill mit häufig auftretenden Fehlern umgeht.

Weitere Informationen zum Validieren von Benutzereingaben finden Sie unter Verarbeitung möglicher Eingabefehler.

Test Erwartete Ergebnisse

1.

Rufen Sie den Skill auf, ohne eine Absicht anzugeben. Beispiel:

  • Öffne <Aufrufsname>.

Bei Aufforderung zum Reagieren, nichts sagen.

  • Der Skill reagiert mit einer Aufforderung, die klärt, welche Informationen Sie angeben sollen.
  • Die Aufforderung gibt klar an, was Sie sagen müssen.
  • Die Aufforderung endet mit einer Frage und lässt die Sitzung geöffnet, damit Sie reagieren können.

Beachten Sie, dass es sich bei der Aufforderung, die Sie hören, um eine erneute Aufforderung handelt, die in der vorherigen Reaktion enthalten ist.

2.

Rufen Sie den Skill mithilfe des folgenden Satzes auf:

  • Öffne <Aufrufsname>.

Wenn Sie zur Reaktion aufgefordert werden, sagen Sie etwas, das mit einer der Skill-Absichten übereinstimmt, jedoch mit ungültigen Slot-Daten.

Wenn die Absicht zum Beispiel einen Slot mit AMAZON.DATE erwartet, sagen Sie etwas, was nicht in ein Datum umgewandelt werden kann.

Wiederholen Sie diesen Test für jeden einzelnen Slot.

  • Der Skill reagiert mit einer Aufforderung oder einem Hilfetext, der deutlich macht, welche Informationen Sie angeben müssen.
  • Die Aufforderung weist klar darauf hin, was Sie sagen müssen.
  • Die Aufforderung endet mit einer Frage und hält die Sitzung geöffnet, damit Sie reagieren können.

Beachten Sie, dass es sich bei der Aufforderung in diesem Szenario nicht um eine erneute Aufforderung handelt, die in der vorherigen Reaktion enthalten ist. Diese Aufforderung muss von der Fehlerbehandlung im Code stammen, der die Absicht steuert.

4.12. Hilfe anbieten

Ein Skill muss eine Hilfeabsicht haben, die zusätzliche Anweisungen zum Navigieren und für den Umgang mit dem Skill anbietet. Implementieren Sie dafür AMAZON.HelpIntent. Sie brauchen für diese Absicht keine eigenen Beispieläußerungen anzugeben, aber Sie müssen sie in den Code für Ihren Skill implementieren. Weitere Hinweise finden Sie unter Implementieren der integrierten Absichten.

Mit diesem Test wird geprüft, ob diese Absicht vorhanden ist und nützliche Informationen liefert.

Test Erwartete Ergebnisse

1.

Rufen Sie den Skill auf, ohne eine Absicht anzugeben. Beispiel:

  • Öffne <Aufrufsname>.

Wenn Sie zu einer Reaktion aufgefordert werden, sagen Sie „Hilfe“.

Für einen einfachen Skill, der auch ohne spezifische Absicht eine vollständige Antwort gibt, (wie im Beispiel „Space Geek“), rufen Sie die Hilfeabsicht direkt auf:

  • Bitte <Aufrufsname> um Hilfe.

Die Reaktion der Hilfe:

  • Liefert Anweisungen, um dem Benutzer bei der Navigation in der Kernfunktion des Skills zu helfen.
  • Ist umfassender als die Aufforderung, die die Benutzer beim Starten des Skills ohne Absicht hören. Die Hilfeaufforderung könnte beispielsweise besser erklären, was der Skill tut, oder den Benutzer darüber informieren, wie er den Skill beenden kann.
  • Informiert den Benutzer darüber, was der Skill tun kann, im Gegensatz dazu, was der Benutzer sagen muss, damit der Skill funktioniert.
  • Endet mit einer Frage, die den Benutzer auffordert, die Anfrage auszuführen.
  • Lässt die Sitzung geöffnet, damit der Benutzer reagieren kann.

Weitere Informationen über das Implementieren der Hilfe für Ihren Skill finden Sie im Abschnitt „Hilfe für komplexe Skills anbieten“ unter Best Practices für Voice Design.

4.13. Stoppen und Abbrechen

Ihr Skill muss angemessen auf allgemeine Äußerungen zum Stoppen und Abbrechen reagieren (etwa „Stopp“, „Abbrechen“, „vergiss es“ und andere). Die integrierten Absichten AMAZON.StopIntent und AMAZON.CancelIntent bieten diese Äußerungen. In den meisten Fällen beenden diese Absichten den Skill einfach, aber Sie können sie auch anderen Funktionen zuordnen, sofern das für Ihren bestimmten Skill sinnvoll ist. Siehe Implementieren der integrierten Absichten.

Test Erwartete Ergebnisse

1.

Starten Sie den Skill und rufen Sie eine Absicht auf, die den Benutzer zu einer Reaktion auffordert.

Nachdem Sie die Aufforderung gehört haben, sagen Sie „Stopp“.

Es folgt eine dieser Reaktionen:

  • Der Skill ist vorhanden.
  • Der Skill gibt eine Reaktion zurück, die der Funktion des Skills entspricht. Die Reaktion ist ebenfalls sinnvoll im Kontext der Aufforderung „Stopp“. Ein Skill, der Bestellungen aufgibt, könnte zum Beispiel mit der Bestätigung reagieren, dass die Bestellung des Benutzers storniert wurde.

Wenn der Skill auf alle Anfragen mit einer vollständigen Antwort reagiert und niemals eine Aufforderung abgibt, überspringen Sie diesen Test.

2.

Rufen Sie eine Absicht auf, die mit längeren Text-zu-Sprache-Umwandlungen reagiert. Sobald Alexa beginnt, die Antwort auszusprechen, sagen Sie „Alexa Stopp“, um die Antwort zu unterbrechen.

Nachdem ein Aktivierungswort Alexa unterbrochen hat, erfolgt eine dieser Aktionen.

  • Der Skill ist vorhanden.
  • Der Skill gibt eine Reaktion zurück, die der Funktion des Skills entspricht. Die Reaktion ist ebenfalls sinnvoll im Kontext der Aufforderung „Stopp“. Ein Skill, der Bestellungen aufgibt, könnte zum Beispiel mit der Bestätigung reagieren, dass die Bestellung des Benutzers storniert wurde.

Wenn alle Skill-Reaktionen zu kurz sind, um sie zu unterbrechen, überspringen Sie diesen Test.

3.

Starten Sie den Skill und rufen Sie eine Absicht auf, die den Benutzer zu einer Reaktion auffordert.

Nachdem Sie die Aufforderung gehört haben, sagen Sie „Abbrechen“.

Es folgt eine dieser Reaktionen:

  • Der Skill ist vorhanden.
  • Der Skill gibt eine Reaktion zurück, die der Funktion des Skills entspricht. Die Reaktion ist ebenfalls sinnvoll im Kontext der Aufforderung „Abbrechen“. Ein Skill, der Bestellungen aufgibt, könnte zum Beispiel mit der Bestätigung reagieren, dass die Bestellung des Benutzers storniert wurde.

Wenn der Skill auf alle Anfragen mit einer vollständigen Antwort reagiert und niemals eine Aufforderung abgibt, überspringen Sie diesen Test.

4.

Rufen Sie eine Absicht auf, die mit längeren Text-zu-Sprache-Umwandlungen reagiert. Sobald Alexa beginnt, die Antwort auszusprechen, sagen Sie „Alexa abbrechen“, um die Antwort zu unterbrechen.

Nachdem ein Aktivierungswort Alexa unterbrochen hat, erfolgt eine dieser Aktionen.

  • Der Skill ist vorhanden.
  • Der Skill gibt eine Reaktion zurück, die der Funktion des Skills entspricht. Die Reaktion ist ebenfalls sinnvoll im Kontext der Aufforderung „Abbrechen“. Ein Skill, der Bestellungen aufgibt, könnte zum Beispiel mit der Bestätigung reagieren, dass die Bestellung des Benutzers storniert wurde.

Wenn alle Skill-Reaktionen zu kurz sind, um sie zu unterbrechen, überspringen Sie diesen Test.

Anhang:Aus dem Verkehr gezogener Test für Beispieläußerungen (Slot-Typ-Werte)

Wenn alle Ihre Slots die neueren Slot-Typen mit dem Namensraum AMAZON verwenden (etwa AMAZON.DATE), brauchen Sie diesen Test nicht durchzuführen.

In früheren Versionen des Alexa Skills Kits war es erforderlich, Slot-Werte einzubeziehen, um die verschiedenen Formulierungen der Slot-Daten in Ihre Beispieläußerungen einzubeziehen. Zum Beispiel wurden Beispieläußerungen für einen DATE-Slot wie folgt geschrieben:

OneshotTideIntent when is high tide on {january first|Date}
OneshotTideIntent when is high tide {tomorrow|Date}
OneshotTideIntent when is high tide {saturday|Date}
...(many more utterances showing different ways to say the date)

Wenn Ihr Skill diese Syntax noch für die integrierten Slot-Typen verwendet, müssen Sie die Beispiel-Slot-Werte in Ihren Beispieläußerungen überarbeiten. Wir empfehlen dringend, zu den aktualisierten Slot-Typen zu migrieren, die keine Beispielwerte mehr erfordern.

Test Erwartete Ergebnisse

1.

Prüfen Sie das Absichtsschema des Skills, um alle Slots ausfindig zu machen. Untersuchen Sie dann die Slot-Typ-Werte in den Beispieläußerungen.

Prüfen Sie, ob die Slot-Typ-Werte ausreichend viele Varianten bieten, damit sie gut erkannt werden.

  • NUMBER: Geben Sie mehrere Möglichkeiten an, Ganzzahlen anzugeben und beziehen Sie Beispiele ein, aus denen der vollständige Zahlenbereich ersichtlich ist, den Sie erwarten (geben Sie z. B. „zehn“, „ein Hundert“ und mehrere Beispiele dazwischen an). Wenn Sie erwarten, dass die verwendeten Zahlen nur in einem engen Bereich liegen, beziehen Sie jede einzelne Zahl in diesem Bereich als Beispielwerte in eine Äußerung ein.
  • DATE: Geben Sie sowohl Beispiele für relative als auch für absolute Kalenderdaten an (zum Beispiel „heute“, „morgen“, „erster september“, „sechsundzwanzigster Juni zwanzig fünfzehn“). Wenn Sie eine bestimmte Gruppe von Sätzen eher als andere erwarten, geben Sie Beispiele für diese Sätze an.
  • TIME: Geben Sie Beispiele für Zeitangaben an („fünfzehn Uhr dreißig“).
  • DURATION: Geben Sie Beispiele für die Angabe verschiedener Zeiträume an („fünf Minuten“, „zehn Tage“, „vier Jahre“).

Nächste Schritte