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Submission Testing Walk-through: Tide Pooler Skill

Introduction

Introduction

This document provides a walk-through that illustrates how you might perform submission testing using a skill called “Tide Pooler.” This skill is one of the sample skills available with the Alexa Skills Kit.

  • See Using the Alexa Skills Kit Samples (Custom Skills) for details about accessing the source code and interaction model for the samples. Tide Pooler is available in both JavaScript and Java.
  • Tide Pooler is also available to customers. To see the detail card for the skill and enable it on your account, open the Amazon Alexa app, click Skills, then scroll the list to Tide Pooler and click Enable.

If you want to follow along with the tests shown in this document, set up the sample as described in either Deploying a Sample Custom Skill to AWS Lambda or Deploying a Sample Custom Skill as a Web Service.

For a high-level testing checklist, see Certification Requirements for Custom Skills.

1. Policy Testing

The Tide Pooler skill meets all of the policy requirements described in Policy Testing.

2. Security Testing

Security Testing depends on how you are hosting the cloud-based service for a skill.

If you set up the skill on AWS Lambda as described in Deploying a Sample Custom Skill to AWS Lambda, Tide Pooler would meet the security requirements.

If you set up the skill as a web service as described in Deploying a Sample Custom Skill as a Web Service, Tide Pooler would not meet the security requirements, since those instructions use a self-signed certificate just for testing. You must use a certificate issued by an Amazon-approved certificate authority for skills hosted as web services.

3. Functional Testing

These sections illustrate completing the Functional Testing for Tide Pooler.

3.1 Review and Test Example Phrases

Example phrases are shown on the skill’s detail card in the Alexa app to help users understand how to interact with the skill. These are the phrases users are most likely to try the first time they interact with the skill. Therefore, make sure that they work well and provide a good user experience.

Review example phrases:

  1. Open the Alexa app, click Skills and then scroll to Tide Pooler.
  2. Review the example phrases. This set of phrases passes this test. The phrases demonstrate the skill’s core functionality (asking for high tide in a location, asking with a specific location and date, and asking for the supported cities):

    • Alexa, ask Tide Pooler when is high tide in Seattle.
    • Alexa, ask Tide Pooler when is high tide in San Diego on Saturday.
    • Alexa, ask Tide Pooler which cities are supported.

In contrast, providing just the following would fail this test because the phrase does not include the wake word and invocation name. In addition, it doesn’t address all the core functionality:

  • When is high tide in Seattle? (This is the first phrase listed, but it does not include the wake word and invocation name.)

Review sample utterances for example phrases:

  1. Open the developer portal, edit the skill, and go to the Interaction Model page.
  2. Review the sample utterances for Tide Pooler. All three are explicitly included:

     OneshotTideIntent when is high tide in {City}
     OneshotTideIntent when is high tide in {City} on {Date}
     SupportedCitiesIntent which cities are supported
    

Test example phrases with a device:

  1. Try launching the skill with each of these example phrases:

    • Alexa, ask Tide Pooler when is high tide in Seattle. (This should give you the Seattle tide information without asking any additional questions)
    • Alexa, ask Tide Pooler when is high tide in San Diego on Saturday. (This should respond with San Diego tide information for the upcoming Saturday date)
    • Alexa, ask Tide Pooler which cities are supported. (This should respond with a list of coastal cities supported by the skill)

The skill would fail the test if any of the three phrases returned an error or a response that does not answer the user’s question.

3.2 Skill Description

The skill description teaches users about what your skill can do and how to use it.

  1. Open the Alexa app, click Skills and then scroll to Tide Pooler.
  2. Review the short description for Tide Pooler shown in the list of skills:

    “Do you live in a coastal city and spend time by the water? Rely on Tide Pooler for tidal information for major coastal cities.”

    This passes since it explains core functionality.

  3. Open the detail card for the skill and review the full description:

    “Do you live in a coastal city and spend time by the water? Rely on Tide Pooler for tidal information for major coastal cities. Information source: NOAA.gov.”

    This description passes the test since it explains core functionality. This skill has no additional prerequisites to describe.

3.3 Home Cards

Home cards are graphical cards displayed in the Alexa app to describe or enhance the voice interaction.

To test Tide Pooler, make different requests to exercise all of the skill’s functionality and review the cards displayed in the Alexa app.

  1. Get tide information for a specific date:

    User: Ask Tide Pooler when will the water be highest on Tuesday
    Tide Pooler: Tuesday September 22nd in Seattle, the first high tide will be around 1:24 in the afternoon, and will peak at about 10 feet, followed by a low tide at around 7:12 in the evening that will be about 6 and a half feet. The second high tide will be around 12:00 in the morning, and will peak at about 9 feet.
    (A card with the same text describing the tides on Saturday is sent to the app)

  2. Walk user through collecting a city and a date:

    User: Alexa, Open Tide Pooler.
    Tide Pooler: Welcome to Tide Pooler. Which city would you like tide information for?
    User: Monterey.
    Tide Pooler: For which date?
    User: Today.
    Tide Pooler: Today in Monterey, the first high tide will be around 12:42 in the morning, and will peak at about 4 and a half feet, followed by a low tide at around 6:36 in the morning that will be about and a half feet. The second high tide will be around 12:48 in the afternoon, and will peak at about 5 feet.
    (A card with the same text describing the tides in Monterey is sent to the app. Note that cards are not included in the responses asking the user for more information, as this would be superfluous)

3.4 Account Linking

Tide Pooler does not require authenticating the user with any other services, so this test is not applicable.

3.5 Audio Playback

Tide Pooler does not use the AudioPlayer interface to stream audio, so this test is not applicable.

3.6 Duplicates of Samples or Templates

Submitting Tide Pooler exactly as provided would fail since it is provided as a sample.

4. Voice Interface and User Experience Testing

These sections illustrate performing the Voice Interface and User Experience Testing for Tide Pooler.

4.1 Session Management

Every response sent from your skill to the Alexa service includes a flag indicating whether the conversation with the user (the session) should end or continue. If the flag is set to continue, Alexa then listens and waits for the user’s response. For Amazon devices such as Amazon Echo that have a blue light ring, the device lights up to give the user a visual cue that Alexa is listening for the user’s response.

This test verifies that the text-to-speech provided by your skill and the session flag work together for a good user experience. Responses that ask questions leave the session open for a reply, while responses that fulfill the user’s request close the session.

  1. Invoke the skill without specifying an intent and verify the responses:

    User: Alexa, Open Tide Pooler.
    Tide Pooler: Welcome to Tide Pooler. Which city would you like tide information for?
    (Blue ring lights up indicating that Alexa is listening for a reply.)
    User: Los Angeles
    Tide Pooler: For which date?
    (Blue ring lights up indicating that Alexa is listening for a reply.)
    User: Today
    Tide Pooler: (response with tide information for Los Angeles today).
    (Session is closed. Blue ring does not light up this time.)

    This passes the test because the session remains open after each question, and then is closed when the response is complete.

  2. Invoke an intent that returns a response with no prompts:

    User: Alexa, Ask Tide Pooler when is high tide in Galveston on September 18th?
    Tide Pooler: (states tide information for Galveston on September 18th).
    (Session is closed. Blue ring does not light up.)

Again, this passes because session ends when the response is complete.

4.2 Intent and Slot Combinations

A skill may have several intents and slots. This test verifies that each intent returns the expected response with different combinations of slots.

To test Tide Pooler, first create a table with the skill’s four intents and all slots, then test each row by voice.

Intent Slot Combination Sample Utterance to Test
OneshotTideIntent None Ask Tide Pooler when is high tide?
OneshotTideIntent City Ask Tide Pooler when is high tide in San Francisco?
OneshotTideIntent Date Ask Tide Pooler when will the water be highest on Tuesday?
OneshotTideIntent City
Date
Ask Tide Pooler to get high tides for Miami tomorrow
DialogTideIntent None N/A - all utterances mapped to this intent include at least one slot
DialogTideIntent City Ask Tide Pooler about San Diego
DialogTideIntent Date Ask Tide Pooler about Tomorrow
DialogTideIntent City
Date
N/A - there are no utterances combining these slots
SupportedCitiesIntent None Ask Tide Pooler what cities are supported
HelpIntent None Ask Tide Pooler for help

Test each of these combinations and verify the response:

User: Alexa, Ask Tide Pooler when is high tide? (OneShotTideIntent with no slots)
Tide Pooler: Today in Seattle, the first high tide will be around 6:48 in the morning, and will peak at about 10 feet, followed by a low tide at around 12:48 in the afternoon that will be about 3 feet. The second high tide will be around 6:54 in the evening, and will peak at about 10 and a half feet. (Skill provided a response using default values since the request did not include any slots)

User: Alexa, Ask Tide Pooler when is high tide in San Francisco (OneShotTideIntent with just the City slot)
Tide Pooler: Tide Pooler: Today in san francisco, the first high tide will be around 2:00 in the morning, and will peak at about 5 feet, followed by a low tide at around 7:36 in the morning that will be about 1 and a half feet. The second high tide will be around 2:06 in the afternoon, and will peak at about 5 and a half feet.

…(remaining the tests shown in the table.)

These tests pass the expected results. Each response is appropriate for the context. In the first example, the skill used defaults since the user did not provide a city or date. In the second example, the skill used the specified city (San Francisco) and defaulted the date to today.

4.3 Intent Response (Design)

A good user experience for a skill depends on the skill having well-designed text-to-speech responses. The “Presenting Information to the User” section of Voice Design Best Practices provides recommendations for designing your skill’s responses. This test verifies that your skill’s responses meet these recommendations.

To test Tide Pooler, refer back to the Intent Response (Intent and Slot Combinations) test for the table showing the set of utterances you can use to test each intent and slot combination. Test each phrase and note whether the design of the response meets the expected results.

For example:

User: Alexa, Ask Tide Pooler when will the water be highest on Tuesday?
Tide Pooler: “Tuesday September 22nd in Seattle, the first high tide will be around 1:24 in the afternoon, and will peak at about 10 feet, followed by a low tide at around 7:12 in the evening that will be about 6 and a half feet. The second high tide will be around 12:00 in the morning, and will peak at about 9 feet.”

This passes each of the expected results:

  • The response answers the user’s question very clearly.
  • The response provides information in consumable chunks.
  • The response does not include technical or legal jargon.
  • The response is written the same way you might say this information in conversation (written for the ear, not the eye).

In contrast, a response like like this, while still presenting the same information, is more difficult to understand as a spoken response and would fail this test:

“9-22-2015. Seattle. High tide one: 1:24 PM. Ten feet. Low tide: 7:12 PM. Six and a half feet. High tide two: 12:00 AM. Nine feet.”

4.4 Supportive Prompting

A user can begin an interaction with your skill without providing enough information to know what they want to do. This might be either a no intent request (the user invokes the skill but does not specify any intent at all) or a partial intent request (the user specifies the intent but does not provide the slot values necessary to fulfill the request).

In these cases, the skill must provide supportive prompts asking the user what they want to do. This test verifies that your skill provides useful prompts for these scenarios.

Invoke Tide Pooler with no intent and note the prompts provided:

User: Alexa, Open Tide Pooler.
Tide Pooler: Welcome to Tide Pooler. Which city would you like tide information for?
User: Monterey
Tide Pooler: For which date?
User: Today
Tide Pooler: Today in Monterey, the first high tide will be around 12:42 in the morning, and will peak at about 4 and a half feet, followed by a low tide at around 6:36 in the morning that will be about 1 and a half feet. The second high tide will be around 12:48 in the afternoon, and will peak at about 5 feet.

The initial prompt includes the skill name, requests the information you need to provide, and ends the interaction with a non-error response, so Tide Pooler would pass this test. In contrast, the following prompt is too verbose and would fail this test:

User: Alexa, Open Tide Pooler.
Tide Pooler: Welcome to Tide Pooler. Which city would you like tide information for? To get tides for a city, say the name of the city. To get tides for a specific date, say the date you want.

Repeat this test, changing the order in your responses to the skill to verify that the skill provides useful prompts in other situations:

User: Alexa, Open Tide Pooler.
Tide Pooler: Welcome to Tide Pooler. Which city would you like tide information for?
User: Today (the user disregarded the prompt and provide the date instead of the city)
Tide Pooler: For which city would you like tide information for Wednesday September 16th? (the skill accepts the date and provides a new prompt to get the city)
User: Monterey
Tide Pooler: Today in Monterey, the first high tide will be around 12:42 in the morning, and will peak at about 4 and a half feet, followed by a low tide at around 6:36 in the morning that will be about 1 and a half feet. The second high tide will be around 12:48 in the afternoon, and will peak at about 5 feet.

Invoke Tide Pooler with a partial intent:

User: Alexa, Ask Tide Pooler about San Diego. (this invokes the DialogTideIntent with a City but no Date)
Tide Pooler: For which date?
User: Today.
Tide Pooler: Wednesday September 23rd in San Diego, the first high tide will be around 6:54 in the morning, and will peak at about 4 and a half feet, followed by a low tide at around 12:06 in the afternoon that will be about 2 and a half feet. The second high tide will be around 6:12 in the evening, and will peak at about 5 and a half feet.

Again, this prompt meets the requirements for a partial intent response with a concise request for the missing information.

4.5 Invocation Name

Users say the invocation name for a skill to begin an interaction.

Review the guidelines provided at Choosing the Invocation Name for a Custom Skill and note that the invocation name “tide pooler” meets these requirements.

4.6 One-Shot Phrasing for Sample Utterances

Most skills provide quick, simple, “one-shot” interactions in which the user asks a question or gives a command, the skill responds with an answer or confirmation, and the interaction is complete. In these interactions, the user invokes your skill and states their intent all in a single phrase.

The ask and tell phrases are the most natural phrases for starting these types of interactions. Therefore, it is critical that you write sample utterances that work well with these phrases and are easy and natural to say.

In these tests, you review the sample utterances you’ve written for the skill, then test them by voice to ensure that they work as expected.

Review the sample utterances for Tide Pooler:

  1. Open the developer portal, edit the skill, and go to the Interaction Model page.
  2. Review the set of sample utterances mapped to the OneshotTideIntent intent. This skill passes the test because it covers all of the noun, question, and command phrasing varieties (note multiple variations of each type of phrase as well):

     OneshotTideIntent tide information
     OneshotTideIntent tide information for {City}
     OneshotTideIntent tide information for {Date}
     OneshotTideIntent when is high tide for {City} {Date}
     OneshotTideIntent tide information for {City} on {Date}
     ...(many additional noun phrase variants)
    
     OneshotTideIntent when is high tide
     OneshotTideIntent when high tide is
     OneshotTideIntent when is next tide
     OneshotTideIntent when is high tide in {City}
     OneshotTideIntent when will the water be highest for {City}
     OneshotTideIntent when is high tide on {Date}
     OneshotTideIntent when is high tide in {City} on {Date}
     ...(many additional question phrase variants)
    
     OneshotTideIntent get high tide
     OneshotTideIntent get high tide for {City}
     OneshotTideIntent get tide information for {City}
     OneshotTideIntent get high tide for {Date}
     OneshotTideIntent get high tide for {City} {Date}
     ...(many additional command phrase variants)
    

Launch the skill using different common patterns:

  1. Invoke the skill multiple times using the common “ask” patterns. Each statement flows naturally and is easy to say:

    User: Alexa, Ask Tide Pooler for the high tides for Saturday.
    Tide Pooler: (states tide information for Seattle on the upcoming Saturday).

    User: Alexa, Ask Tide Pooler about tide information.
    Tide Pooler: (states tide information for Seattle today).

    User: Alexa, Ask Tide Pooler to get tide information for Miami.
    Tide Pooler: (states tide information for Miami today).

  2. Invoke the skill with the generic “ask” pattern. Again, the statement flows naturally:

    User: Alexa, Ask Tide Pooler when is high tide in Galveston on September 18th?
    Tide Pooler: (states tide information for Galveston on September 18th).

    User: Alexa, Ask Tide Pooler when the water will be highest for San Francisco?
    Tide Pooler: (states tide information for San Francisco today).

  3. Invoke the skill with the common “tell” pattern. Again, the statement should flow naturally:

    User: Alexa, Tell Tide Pooler to get tide information for Virginia Beach.
    Tide Pooler: (states tide information for Virginia Beach today).

  4. Review the other ask and tell patterns in Supported Phrases to Begin a Conversation.

    For Tide Pooler, these other patterns such as “ask…whether” and “ask…if” are not natural ways to ask for tide information, so they do not need to pass this test. For example, the question “ask Tide Pooler whether there are high tides today” is not an intuitive way to ask for this information (the user knows there are high tides, the question is “when”, not “whether.” It is unlikely that a user would phrase their request this way).

Note: For additional tips on improving the user experience for your skill, see these resources:

4.7 Variety of Sample Utterances

Given the flexibility and variation of spoken language in the real world, there will often be many different ways to express the same request. Therefore, your sample utterances should include multiple ways to phrase the same intent. In this test, inspect the sample utterances for all intents, not just the “one shot” intents described in Sample Utterances (One-Shot Phrasing).

To test Tide Pooler, first note that the skill has three core intents:

  • OneshotTideIntent is the main intent used when launching the skill and asking for tide information at the same time.
  • DialogTideIntent is used for filling in the gaps if the user launches the skill and does not provide the city and date.
  • SupportedCitiesIntent lets the user ask for the list of cities the skills supports.

For each of these intents, identify different ways to ask for that intent, and then review the corresponding sample utterances to ensure that all those different phrases are covered.

Intent Ways to Ask for this Intent Do the Sample Utterances Cover these Phrasings?

OneshotTideIntent

Possible ways to ask for this intent:

  • tide information…
  • When is high tide for…
  • When will the water…
  • Get tide information for…
  • Give me the high tides…
  • Tell me the tide information

The sample utterances provide good coverage for variants of most of these phrases. For instance:

  • There are several variations of “get” (“get tide information for…”, “get tides for…”, “get high tide for…”, etc.)
  • There are several variations of “when”(“when is high tide for…”, “when is the next…”, “when will the water be…”)

One improvement for this intent would be to add more utterances with the “give” and “tell” variants, such as “give me the tides for…” or “tell me the tides for…”

DialogTideIntent

Possible ways to ask for this intent:

  • Seattle (or other city)
  • today
  • Specific date

(this intent fills in missing information in context, so the user just says a city or date).

The sample utterances fully cover the purpose of this intent:

DialogTideIntent {City} 
DialogTideIntent {City} {State} 
DialogTideIntent {Date} 

SupportedCitiesIntent

Possible ways to ask for this intent:

  • what cities are supported
  • which cities…
  • tell me cities I can ask about
  • give me the cities you support

The sample utterances cover the “what”and “which” phrasings. The utterances for this intent could be improved by adding “give” and “tell” patterns as well.

4.8 Intents and Slot Types

Slots are defined with different types. Built-in types such as AMAZON.DATE convert the user’s spoken text into a different format (such as converting the spoken text “august fifth” into the date format “2015-08-05”). Custom slot types are used for items that are not covered by Amazon’s built-in types.

For this test, review the intent schema and ensure that the correct slot types are used for the type of data the slot is intended to collect.

  1. Open the developer portal, edit the skill, and go to the Interaction Model page.
  2. Review the intent schema and note that it defines three slots (used in OneshotTideIntent and DialogTideIntent):

    • City (custom slot type LIST_OF_CITIES)
    • State (custom slot type LIST_OF_STATES)
    • Date (built-in slot type AMAZON.DATE)

The use of these types matches the usage describe in the Slot Types table above, so the skill passes this test.

In contrast, if Tide Pooler defined the City or State slot as an AMAZON.LITERAL type instead of a custom slot type, it would fail this test. The skill would work, but this is not a good use case for AMAZON.LITERAL.

4.9 Custom Slot Type Values

The custom slot type is used for items that are not covered by Amazon’s built-in types and is recommended for most use cases where a slot value is one of a set of possible values.

  1. Open the developer portal, edit the Tide Pooler skill, and go to the Interaction Model page.
  2. Note that it defines two custom slot types: LIST_OF_CITIES and LIST_OF_STATES.
  3. Review the list of values for each of these types.

    • LIST_OF_CITIES contains the 17 coastal cities the skill supports. This is the complete list. Any values outside this list are invalid for the slot.
    • LIST_OF_STATES contains the ten states those cities are in. This is the complete list. Any values outside this list are invalid for the slot.

For an example of a custom slot type that cannot include all possible values, see the Score Keeper sample. The intent schema for this skill defines a LIST_OF_PLAYER_NAMES slot type. Since it is impossible to identify every possible name that a user might use, the type defines a representative list of over 600 possible names.

4.10 Writing Conventions for Sample Utterances

Sample utterances must be written according to defined rules in order to successfully build a speech model for your skill.

  1. Open the developer portal, edit the Tide Pooler skill, and go to the Interaction Model page.
  2. Review the sample utterances and note whether they adhere to these conventions. For example, note these excerpts:

    OneshotTideIntent when is high tide
    OneshotTideIntent when high tide is
    OneshotTideIntent when is the next high tide today
    OneshotTideIntent when is next tide
    OneshotTideIntent when is today's highest tide
    ...
    OneshotTideIntent get high tide for {City} {State}
    OneshotTideIntent get high tide for {City} {State} {Date}
    OneshotTideIntent get high tide for {City} {Date}
    ...
    OneshotTideIntent when is the next highest water for {City} {State} for {Date}
    OneshotTideIntent get high tide for {City} {State} {Date}
    ...
    

    These utterances all adhere to the writing conventions.

4.11 Error Handling

Unlike a visual interface, where the user can only interact with the objects presented on the screen, there is no way to limit what users can say in a speech interaction. Your skill needs to handle a variety of errors in an intelligent and user-friendly way. This test verifies your skill’s ability to handle common errors.

  1. Test the prompt after silence:

    User: Alexa, Open Tide Pooler.
    Tide Pooler: Welcome to Tide Pooler. Which city would you like tide information for?
    User: (silence)
    Tide Pooler: I can lead you through providing a city and day of the week to get tide information, or you can simply open Tide Pooler and ask a question like, get tide information for Seattle on Saturday. For a list of supported cities, ask what cities are supported. Which city would you like tide information for?
    (Blue ring lights up indicating that Alexa is listening for a reply.)

  2. Test the prompt when providing invalid data for the City slot:

    User: Alexa, Open Tide Pooler.
    Tide Pooler: Welcome to Tide Pooler. Which city would you like tide information for?
    User: Chicago (this is not a supported city, so it is invalid data for the City slot)
    Tide Pooler: Currently, I know tide information for these west coast cities: seattle, san francisco, monterey, los angeles, san diego, Which city would you like tide information for?
    (Blue ring lights up indicating that Alexa is listening for a reply.)

  3. Test the prompt when providing invalid data for the Date slot:

    User: Alexa, Open Tide Pooler.
    Tide Pooler: Welcome to Tide Pooler. Which city would you like tide information for?
    User: Los Angeles
    Tide Pooler: For which date?
    User: Blue (this is invalid data for the Date slot)
    Tide Pooler: I’m sorry, I didn’t understand that date. Please try again saying a day of the week, for example, Saturday. For which date would you like tide information?”
    (Blue ring lights up indicating that Alexa is listening for a reply.)

In each of these tests, the skill responds with a useful prompt that explains what the user needs to do to continue. Each prompt ends with a question and the session remains open to listen for a reply.

For more information about error handling, see the “Handling Dialogue Errors” section of Voice Design Best Practices.

4.12 Providing Help

Each skill should have a help intent that can provide additional instructions for navigating and using the skill. This test verifies that this intent exists and provides useful information.

  1. Invoke the skill with no intent, then ask for help:

    User: Alexa, Open Tide Pooler.
    Tide Pooler: Welcome to Tide Pooler. Which city would you like tide information for?
    User: help.
    Tide Pooler: I can lead you through providing a city and day of the week to get tide information, or you can simply open Tide Pooler and ask a question like, get tide information for Seattle on Saturday. For a list of supported cities, ask what cities are supported. Or you can say exit. Which city would you like tide information for?
    (Blue ring lights up indicating that Alexa is listening for a reply.)

    Note that this help text is more comprehensive than the initial prompt for a city.

  2. Test additional ways of asking for help. These bring back the same help text:

    User: Alexa, ask Tide Pooler what do you do?
    Tide Pooler: I can lead you through providing a city and day of the week to get tide information, or you can simply open Tide Pooler and ask a question like, get tide information for Seattle on Saturday. For a list of supported cities, ask what cities are supported. Or you can say exit. Which city would you like tide information for?
    (Blue ring lights up indicating that Alexa is listening for a reply.)

4.13 Stopping and Canceling

Your skill must respond appropriately to common utterances for stopping and canceling actions (such as “stop,” “cancel,” “never mind,” and others). The built-in AMAZON.StopIntent and AMAZON.CancelIntent intents provide these utterances. In most cases, these intents should just exit the skill, but you can map them to alternate functionality if it makes sense for your particular skill. See Implementing the Built-in Intents.

  1. Invoke the skill with no intent and exit after hearing a prompt:

    User: Alexa, Open Tide Pooler.
    Tide Pooler: Welcome to Tide Pooler. Which city would you like tide information for?
    User: Stop.
    (Skill exits).

  2. Invoke an intent and interrupt Alexa during the text-to-speech:

    User: Alexa, Ask Tide Pooler for high tides in Monterey.
    Tide Pooler: Today in Monterey, the first high tide…(Interrupt Alexa before the skill completes the response)
    User: Alexa, Stop.
    (Skill exits).

  3. Repeat the above two tests using the word “cancel” instead of “stop.”

Next Steps