Whispersync Adds Automatic Conflict Resolution as GameCircle Expands to All Android Devices

We just released a major update to Amazon GameCircle, our free game service providing achievements, leaderboards, and Whispersync for Games. Games on all Android devices (including Kindle Fire, of course) can now integrate GameCircle, which is easy because we support Java, JNI, and Unity3D. Whether you submit your game to Amazon or Google, customers will benefit from the GameCircle experience. In addition, Whispersync has been dramatically improved, becoming the first and only cloud-save service to:

1) Automatically resolve data conflicts between mobile devices and the cloud,

2) Queue updates to support offline operation, and

3) Offer a simple interface that can be integrated in minutes.

The result: Your customers’ game data will automatically sync across devices—even if they play your game while temporarily offline—and you can concentrate on using the data instead of persisting it. You’re not locked in, though; you retain ownership and can always get a copy of the data you store.

We also give you flexibility when it comes to GameCircle display options, with no intrusive splash screen and configurable notification toasts. You’re in control and choose where they appear.

I’ll provide more technical details about these enhancements in future posts, but for now, let’s take a closer look Whispersync and explore its powerful new features and simplified interface.

Whispersync for Games

Whispersync does the heavy lifting when it comes to synchronizing local data to and from the cloud. It handles the tricky scenarios that you would normally have to deal with yourself, like conflicting updates from multiple devices or sync requests from a device that’s temporarily offline. You can also stop worrying about scalability; behind the curtain, Whispersync (and all of GameCircle) is powered by Amazon Web Services like S3 and DynamoDB.

Using Whispersync is easy through an API that has been completely redesigned, providing an interface similar to SharedPreferences. Saving game data to the cloud and synchronizing it between devices is as easy as retrieving a variable from a map and using (or changing) its value:

    // Get the global game data map for the current player.
    GameDataMap gameDataMap = AmazonGamesClient.getWhispersyncClient().getGameData();

    // Look up the object representing the player’s skill rating.
    // If none exists, one will be created.

    SyncableNumber skillRating = gameDataMap.getHighestNumber("skillRating");
    System.out.println("skillRating = " + skillRating.asLong());

    . . .

    // Update the value. As long as this device is online (or as soon as
    // it is), local and cloud storage will be synced.

    skillRating.set(MAX_SKILLRATING);

Whispersync maintains a singleton instance of GameDataMap that acts as the root of your game data. It can track numbers, strings, simple lists, and other maps, and gives you complete freedom in how you represent your game data using these basic syncable types. You add new variables simply by retrieving them by name; if they don’t exist, they’ll be created on the fly and synchronized from that point on.

How Whispersync applies updates and resolves conflicts depends on the way you access each syncable variable. For example, suppose you want to retrieve the current user’s best (highest) level across all devices:

    GameDataMap gameDataMap = AmazonGamesClient.getWhispersyncClient().getGameData();
    SyncableNumber bestLevel = gameDataMap.getHighestNumber( "bestLevel" );
    System.out.println( "bestLevel = "  + bestLevel.asLong());

In this case, because “bestLevel” is retrieved as a highest number, it will always reflect the maximum value ever assigned to it, from anywhere, on any device.

String values can also be synced. You could easily set the name of the latest power-up collected:

    gameDataMap.getLatestString( "lastPowerUp" ).set("Super Boingo"); 

The syncable string associated with “lastPowerUp” will always reflect the value most recently assigned to it.

The online documentation and Javadoc included with the SDK have more information on the syncable types Whispersync supports, as well as the ways in which each may be accessed.

Practical Applications

Let me provide a few more examples to illustrate just how straightforward synchronization can be.

Recording Star Count for Several Levels

A common pattern in many games is to show stars and unlock status for each level on a level selection screen. Here’s an example of using Whispersync to track individual star values for multiple levels:

  SyncableNumber[] getLevelStars() {
     GameDataMap gameDataMap = AmazonGamesClient.getWhispersyncClient().getGameData();
     SyncableNumber[] stars = new SyncableNumber[NUM_LEVELS];

     // Get the star counts for all levels.
    
for (int i = 0; i < stars.length; i++) {
        stars[i] = gameDataMap.getHighestNumber("levelStars" + i);
     }

     return stars;
  }

The first time the score values are accessed (from anywhere), Whispersync will create entries for them in the cloud, so there’s no need to declare them ahead of time.

Accumulating a Running Total

Some progress, like coins collected or time played, represents a running total that is always updated using a delta amount. Instead of setting the value directly, you just submit the amount by which it should change. Whispersync automatically adds or subtracts this value to update the current total. For example:

 void addTimePlayedToTotal(long timePlayed) {
    GameDataMap gameDataMap = AmazonGamesClient.getWhispersyncClient().getGameData();
    SyncableAccumulatingNumber totalTime =        gameDataMap.getAccumulatingNumber("totalTime");

    // This object may be incremented/decremented with long, double, and
    // BigDecimal values.

    totalTime.increment(timePlayed);
    System.out.println("Total time played: " + totalTime.asLong());
 }

Keeping a Map of Maps

By embedding a map within a map, you can create a hierarchical data structure. If your game has multiple worlds, for example, you might keep a separate GameDataMap for each one. Each of these might contain additional maps—say, one for each level.

 GameDataMap getWorldData(String name) {
    GameDataMap gameDataMap = AmazonGamesClient.getWhispersyncClient().getGameData();

    // Get all the string keys associated with top-level GameDataMap objects.
    Set<String> worldNames = gameDataMap.getMapKeys();

    // Look for a match among the maps.
    for (String currentName : worldNames) {
       if (currentName.equals(name)) {
          // A map exists for the name specified.
          return gameDataMap.getMap(currentName);
       }
    }

    // No match found. Don't create one.
    return null;
 }

Maintaining a List of Numbers

A racing game might save a player’s top three best times using a syncable number list. In this case, you could create a list for low numbers—they decrease as times improve—but you could easily choose to retain a collection of the highest or most recent values in other situations.

 // We'll initialize this once the application has launched.
 AmazonGames agsGameClient;
 GameDataMap agsGameData;
 SyncableNumberList agsBestTimes;

 // Create a callback to handle initialization result codes.
 AmazonGamesCallback agsGameCallback = new AmazonGamesCallback() {
    @Override
    public void onServiceReady(AmazonGamesClient client) {
       agsGameClient = client;
       agsGameData = AmazonGamesClient.getWhispersyncClient().getGameData();

       // Establish how many slots will be allocated and preserved.
       agsBestTimes = agsGameData.getLowNumberList("bestTimes");
       agsBestTimes.setMaxSize(3);
    }

    . . .
 };

  void finishLap(double time) {
   // Every time a lap is completed, try to add the lap time
   // to our list of best times. Only the lowest three will
   // ever be preserved.

   agsBestTimes.add(time);
 }

Every time the player finishes a lap, finishLap() would be called to update the number list. The value specified will be discarded unless it is lower than one of the current entries.

More to Come

The GameCircle improvements released in the latest update deserve more attention than the brief overview I’ve given here, so I’ll add details in the coming weeks. Look for articles dedicated to JNI; advanced API features; and using GameCircle with frameworks such as Unity3D, Cocos2d-x, and Marmalade. I’ll also dive deeper into Whispersync, discussing the difference between mergeable and non-mergeable data (and why it’s important), considerations when synchronizing currency across offline devices, and migration from the previous version. Stay tuned!

In the meantime, check out the new GameCircle release and give it a whirl. You’ll benefit whether you use the simplified Whispersync API and its expanded functionality, create a universal build to run on Kindle Fire and Android, or take advantage of the other features included with this update.

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